Searching Patterns

rvrwaderrvrwader MemberPosts: 42 Member
Simple question.. What is your best searching pattern? For me it would be the good ole Elk Hair Caddis.
Well, I aint always right but I've never been wrong.....


http://rvrwader.blogspot.com

Replies

  • NZ IndicatorNZ Indicator Senior Member Posts: 10,474 Senior Member
    Soft hackle pheasant tail trailed with a soft hackle hairs ear. Sizes 14-16.

    I like the contrast of the 2 flies and when nothing is rising I find the trout more eager to hit flies sub-surface vs. a dry fly attractor.
  • ricinusricinus Senior Member Posts: 6,214 Senior Member
    It's funny, I've not had much luck using an Elk Hair Caddis, so this year I'll try a CDC and Elk.

    Mike
    My new goal in life is to become an Alter Kaker...
  • Beetle.

    1 out of every four living entities on the planet is a beetle.
  • yataheyyatahey Senior Member Posts: 5,605 Senior Member
    Size 10 Amy's Ant. Doubles as an indicator.
    "When the goin gets weird, the weird turn pro." Hunter S. Thompson
  • Brian D.Brian D. Senior Member Posts: 4,011 Senior Member
    Steven wrote: »
    1 out of every four living entities on the planet is a beetle.

    No way that statistic is true. Even if you add "multicellular" to your claim I'm still skeptical. But it is good to see you being wrong on a different forum for variety. :)


    Sent from my SPH-M580 using Tapatalk
  • Brian D.Brian D. Senior Member Posts: 4,011 Senior Member
    Having gotten the Steven smackdown out of the way, I'll say my favorite searching pattern is a prince nymph.


    Sent from my SPH-M580 using Tapatalk
  • rvrwaderrvrwader Member Posts: 42 Member
    Now that I think about it, I have only caught Brookies with the EHC. Will have to try some of these others this year
    Well, I aint always right but I've never been wrong.....


    http://rvrwader.blogspot.com
  • Brian D. wrote: »
    No way that statistic is true. Even if you add "multicellular" to your claim I'm still skeptical. But it is good to see you being wrong on a different forum for variety. :)


    Sent from my SPH-M580 using Tapatalk

    Don't be so sure, my friend.

    There are millions of beetle species and 40% of insects are classified as beetles.
  • ricinusricinus Senior Member Posts: 6,214 Senior Member
    It also depends on the time of year and weather.

    Mike
    My new goal in life is to become an Alter Kaker...
  • NZ IndicatorNZ Indicator Senior Member Posts: 10,474 Senior Member
    rvrwader wrote: »
    Now that I think about it, I have only caught Brookies with the EHC. Will have to try some of these others this year

    That's because brookies are easy. ;)
  • ScottPScottP Senior Member Posts: 480 Senior Member
    This

    IMG_8627.jpg

    this

    IMG_7957.jpg

    or this

    IMG_8023.jpg

    Regards,
    Scott
    They say the times are changing but I just don't know
  • Brian D.Brian D. Senior Member Posts: 4,011 Senior Member
    Steven wrote: »
    Don't be so sure, my friend.

    There are millions of beetle species and 40% of insects are classified as beetles.

    If you said "one in four species" on the planet is a beetle, I'd say you may be right. But in terms of sheer numbers, I have serious doubts. If you go with simple "living entities," there are probably more bacteria in your colon than all the beetles on earth. Even if we restrict it to multicellular organisms, there are endless multitudes of plants, fungi, and even some multicellular protists balanced against your beetle numbers before we even start into the animal kingdom. There are numerous mites and roundworms that only parasitize beetles. I guess it's possible, but it would strike me as unusual that the beetles outnumber their parasites. In fact, now that I'm thinking about it, I'm willing to bet that flatworms and roundworms probably win the numbers game by far among complex living organisms.

    I just doubt the 25% of all living things are beetles stat holds water.

    bd
  • something with Tungsten. Anything, really. So long as there's tungsten.
  • rvrwaderrvrwader Member Posts: 42 Member
    joekrz wrote: »
    That's because brookies are easy. ;)

    That's why I like fishing brookies when there is not hatch going on. LOL
    Well, I aint always right but I've never been wrong.....


    http://rvrwader.blogspot.com
  • rvrwaderrvrwader Member Posts: 42 Member
    Thanks for all the suggestions. I am going to give more than a few of them a shot this year.
    Well, I aint always right but I've never been wrong.....


    http://rvrwader.blogspot.com
  • ouzelproouzelpro Senior Member Posts: 5,361 Senior Member
    Nice flies, Scott.

    Early season: a mayfly nymph or caddis pupa with as much weight as possible. Warm weather: some sort of hopper/dropper, but the "hopper" can be a foam beetle or some other attractor.

    I always try a skating caddis in the late afternoon, early evening. I like LaFontaine's caddis with a bullethead of thin packing foam. Fish go nuts over that.
  • FlytyerFlytyer Senior Member Posts: 131 Senior Member
    I like any winged Caddis 14-16.
  • Brian D. wrote: »
    If you said "one in four species" on the planet is a beetle, I'd say you may be right. But in terms of sheer numbers, I have serious doubts. If you go with simple "living entities," there are probably more bacteria in your colon than all the beetles on earth. Even if we restrict it to multicellular organisms, there are endless multitudes of plants, fungi, and even some multicellular protists balanced against your beetle numbers before we even start into the animal kingdom. There are numerous mites and roundworms that only parasitize beetles. I guess it's possible, but it would strike me as unusual that the beetles outnumber their parasites. In fact, now that I'm thinking about it, I'm willing to bet that flatworms and roundworms probably win the numbers game by far among complex living organisms.

    I just doubt the 25% of all living things are beetles stat holds water.

    bd

    Who knew BD was a biology ****? Multicellular living things that move for $500 Alex.
  • JulietJuliet Posts: 0
    An egg pattern.
  • TrootfisherTrootfisher Senior Member Posts: 901 Senior Member
    Brian D. wrote: »
    Having gotten the Steven smackdown out of the way, I'll say my favorite searching pattern is a prince nymph.

    +1



    .................................
  • ouzelproouzelpro Senior Member Posts: 5,361 Senior Member
    A Migrating Coconut.
  • dryfliedryflie Senior Member Posts: 1,442 Senior Member
    The Beetles were a great band.
    “The modern conservative is engaged in one of man's oldest exercises in moral philosophy; that is, the search for a superior moral justification for selfishness.” - John Kenneth Galbraith
  • George KGeorge K Super Moderator Posts: 10,208 Senior Member
    Rat Faced McDougal in fast water, Parachute Adams in slower water, light mayfly emerger/cripple in limestone creeks.
    Keep your stinkin' government hands off my Medicare.
  • steve ssteve s Junior Member Posts: 9 Junior Member
    For many years it was a little tan caddis, sort of like the EHC except tied with softer, deer body hair wing.

    Here's my current favorite--Steve's Pretty Good Emerger

    stevesbwo-pheasantemerger.jpg
  • rvrwaderrvrwader Member Posts: 42 Member
    steve s wrote: »
    For many years it was a little tan caddis, sort of like the EHC except tied with softer, deer body hair wing.

    Here's my current favorite--Steve's Pretty Good Emerger

    stevesbwo-pheasantemerger.jpg

    Love the fly Steve... My eyes are not what they used to be. did you use Grizzly hackle? I will be tying up a few for the opener...
    Well, I aint always right but I've never been wrong.....


    http://rvrwader.blogspot.com
  • steve ssteve s Junior Member Posts: 9 Junior Member
    rvrwader wrote: »
    Love the fly Steve... My eyes are not what they used to be. did you use Grizzly hackle? I will be tying up a few for the opener...

    Some shade of dun. Usually, sort of darkish, but depending on the BWO's that are out and about also use light dun. Same with the wing color. My thinking is that some sort or other of BWO is around almost all season long, so the pattern is never too far fetched. Use a scud or Klinkhamer style hook, and only grease the wing/hackle/olive thorax, so the pheasant tail "nymph" case suspends below the water.

    When in doubt about size, go smaller; when not in doubt, go smaller--especially for the dab of olive fur. I mostly use #16-20. Since the concept is to imitate both the nymph case and the newly emerged dun, the size of the natural being imitated is about half the hook shank size, which makes life easier. A simlar pattern works pretty well for PMD's out west, by the way.

    Let me know how it works for you!

    Steve

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