The Millennials Have Discovered Fly Fishing

2

Replies

  • NZ IndicatorNZ Indicator Senior Member Posts: 10,247 Senior Member
    edited October 16 #32

    @fishingcomic said:

    I will confess every spot I fish I either learned from a friend or a fly shop. I am not that good with topo maps.

    I used topo maps, forest service maps and a compass, which was then followed by using the Delorme Maps and then later on switched to GPS. I've spent an entire day with Delorme in hand driving back roads finding spots I wanted to fish and have found every spot on my own.

    Nothing ventured, nothing gained. Some spots were a bust. Some were hot.

  • NZ IndicatorNZ Indicator Senior Member Posts: 10,247 Senior Member

    @breamfisher said:

    1. Who's to say that scouting via Google Maps prior to actually hitting the water is bad? I've done it for work: looking for a publicly-accessed waterbody or chunk of forest, if I can weed out some spots without actually setting foot on the ground or wetting a boat, that's a time saver for me. Unless you're just looking for an excuse to get in the woods or on the water (not that that's a bad thing) time saved can make for more efficient time in the area.

    I don't think google maps or google earth is a spot burner, because as least the person has to do the leg work to get there and figure it out.

  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 4,827 Senior Member

    You'd be surprised how many folks complain about it, not just for fly fishing. It can get real common for some hunting and wildlife viewing, especially in areas of limited opportunity. The article you linked even mentions Google Maps.

    Here's two hints (not directed to you, but more in general):
    1. You don't have to tag where you caught all the fish on social media.
    2. You don't have to include those photos on Google Maps where you got the fish.

    If people just kept their mouths shut, the secret spots would stay... secret.

    I do think that folks are losing the ability to find fish, but our old project leader said that when boats went from 15 hp to 150 hp, folks started to lose that ability: they could just blast off to the next good site rather than learn to read the water and fish an area.

  • NZ IndicatorNZ Indicator Senior Member Posts: 10,247 Senior Member

    Some truth to all of that. Having everything immediately available has turned some into gluttons and thinking they have a sense of entitlement. What's gone for some of these folks is the endless hours of driving or walking around to find new water to fish and achieving self discovery.

    The majority of my favorite spots I fish have been found without instruction from others, internet searches, Facebook or forum inquiries. It's just been me or me and a few friends putting boots on the ground. And when I've done this, I start to learn the nuances of each of these new places and what times of the year they fish the best and then I tend to guard these places a little more instead of blabbing about them on the world wide web.

  • LandoLando Posts: 70 Member
    edited October 16 #36

    Google Earth is money. This guy, not so much.......

  • bmmikebmmike Posts: 541 Senior Member
    edited October 16 #37
    1. The place in the original post looks horrifying. Just imaging interacting with those people is making me anxious.
    2. Who cares how people get their infomations? This reminds me of an early lesson most of us learnt, or should have learnt, when the first time we saw some other little kid doing something we thought they shouldn’t, tattled to mom, then were told, “you just worry about yourself”.
    3. Hi Lando!
    4. Tree stands are for fats, cripples, and the elderly.
    5. Here is a pitcher of the latest bird-on-bird violence:
    6. I’ll check back in, in another couple months. Carry on


  • MikeAMikeA Senior Member Posts: 4,172 Senior Member
    edited October 16 #38

    Maybe where you live, but I live in a deciduous forest with thick underbrush. Seeing anything from the ground beyond 50 yards is a rarity.

    Nice Peregrine.

  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 10,586 Senior Member

    Yeah, boo on the tree stand comment. You western plains, wide open spaces hunter. Come down here in the bullis vines and dog fennels.

  • MikeAMikeA Senior Member Posts: 4,172 Senior Member

    Range finders are for the elderly fats and cripples. 😊

  • BushartBushart Senior Member Posts: 3,041 Senior Member

    Don't sweat this Mike A.----that comment is just a troll
    Call it The Field and Stream Cover Boy Complex

    We all can't be the quickest pepper spray shooter in the west

    I have hunted areas like yours and we used to chase with dogs---due to the thick cover

    You are utilizing a logical method to achieve the desired result---ya gotta see em to shoot em

    Native Canadians in Alberta used to drive buffalo off of cliffs on horseback--you do what is required

    Stand hunting requires intangibles

    Stand placement
    calling
    wind
    scent control
    sight lines

    Keep on brother

  • Shawn C.Shawn C. Senior Member Posts: 7,027 Senior Member

    You know what would cure those hipsters of any desire to fly fish?
    Booking a trip with Sheb's All Service Guiding Company.

    "Hey Chad, you plan on boating any fish today? I'm not saying, but you know... just throwing this out there as a discussion point ... but you might really suck at this. Just sayin'"

  • sherbsherb Senior Member Posts: 4,232 Senior Member

    I’m a motivator

  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 4,827 Senior Member

    I guess I shouldn't mention that all of my deer hunting has been using a pack of hounds to run the deer...

  • Shawn C.Shawn C. Senior Member Posts: 7,027 Senior Member
    edited October 17 #45

    I thought you Floridians only did that with raccoons (ahem, Buffy) and opossums.

  • bmmikebmmike Posts: 541 Senior Member
    edited October 17 #46

    Don't forget I used to live 'back east'. I know all about hunting from a stand. ;)

    Running deer with hounds sounds really neat. Id be into that -- watching good dog work is pretty high on my list of enjoyable things.

    There is a horse archery club in the area. I need another thing to take up my time like I need a hole in my head, but this is just so dog danged enticing...

    I am imaging myself upon the cover of Outdoors Field Life and Streams. Perched atop noble steed, falcon on fist, in other hand a traditional recurve, dead bull elk at my steeds feet, dogs standing noble in front of a pile of dead grouse. Glory. True glory.

  • Shawn C.Shawn C. Senior Member Posts: 7,027 Senior Member

    You could also operate your scythe from said steed. Kinda like a riding mower.

  • StevenSteven Senior Member Posts: 3,608 Senior Member

    @sherb said:
    I’m a motivator

    After the 10th false cast: "Uh...you plan on putting that thing in the water?"

  • MikeAMikeA Senior Member Posts: 4,172 Senior Member

    I grew up watching bird dogs point Quail. My father and grandfather trained them. The Quail have all but disappeared from here and so have the bird dogs. Used to hunt rabbits with beagles and that’s a hoot! I still see people using hounds for Black Bear in the east TN mountains. I’m not a fan, but to each his own I guess.
    Mike, do you ever miss this side of the country?

  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 4,827 Senior Member
    edited October 17 #51

    @bmmike said:

    Running deer with hounds sounds really neat. Id be into that -- watching good dog work is pretty high on my list of enjoyable things.

    I love watching good dogs work. Unfortunately here, you run dogs because scrub oak, slash pine, and saw palmetto make vision very difficult. Hence the dogs: they run the deer to you. Most folks use Walker hounds, some use beagles. But what you try to do is get ahead of them down a forest road and basically jump the deer as it crosses a clearing.

    Here's an example of some of the habitat.

    On the other hand, I love to watch a good pointer work on quail. Yes, we used to have quail in Florida, back when we had orange groves. The grove and its associated fence areas created decent quail habitat. Alas, most orange groves are now housing developments. Also the timberlands are being managed differently. Those two and fire ants have really done a number on our quail. But I loved quail hunting behind a good pointer, preferably a German Shorthair. Second up was dove shooting (I don't really consider it hunting) and watching a good retriever work the birds.

  • MikeAMikeA Senior Member Posts: 4,172 Senior Member

    Bream are you a native Floridian?

  • bmmikebmmike Posts: 541 Senior Member
    edited October 17 #53

    Yes. The food out here, aside from steaks and burgers, is ****. Sometimes I feel like a nice bowl of pho and a few summer rolls with peanut sauce, or some lamb kabobs and grape leaves, or some of that Peruvian chicken with the jalapeño sauce, or some good crepes, or just a decent New York-style pizza — but there is none of that here. The Asian stuff, especially, I have found surprisingly difficult to prepare right myself, especially considering it seems so simple.

    Aside from that, not really.

  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 4,827 Senior Member

    @MikeA said:
    Bream are you a native Floridian?

    Multi-generational. Grew up in Central Florida. One of those folks who has almost always lived nearish to Disney (within an hour's drive or so) but only goes under protest.

  • bmmikebmmike Posts: 541 Senior Member

    @breamfisher said:

    On the other hand, I love to watch a good pointer work on quail. Yes, we used to have quail in Florida, back when we had orange groves. The grove and its associated fence areas created decent quail habitat. Alas, most orange groves are now housing developments. Also the timberlands are being managed differently. Those two and fire ants have really done a number on our quail. But I loved quail hunting behind a good pointer, preferably a German Shorthair. Second up was dove shooting (I don't really consider it hunting) and watching a good retriever work the birds.

    I lived in Florida for a year as a child. This was the first place my family moved when we moved east, prior to moving to Maryland. I would have been 7 or so.

    I still recall playing in the woods behind the house, chasing around bob white quail. I wanted to befriend them and make them my pets.

  • BushartBushart Senior Member Posts: 3,041 Senior Member

    @breamfisher said:
    I guess I shouldn't mention that all of my deer hunting has been using a pack of hounds to run the deer...

    I cut my deer hunting teeth doing this

    I had the latest technology---so I really have to tip my hat to my ancestors who did this successfully with open iron sights

    Thick hardwood forests---you may get the distance of a trail to shoot---and those deer were not walking out

  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 4,827 Senior Member

    @bmmike said:

    I lived in Florida for a year as a child. This was the first place my family moved when we moved east, prior to moving to Maryland. I would have been 7 or so.

    I still recall playing in the woods behind the house, chasing around bob white quail. I wanted to befriend them and make them my pets.

    They woulda been tasty pets. Very tasty.

  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 4,827 Senior Member

    @Bushart said:

    I cut my deer hunting teeth doing this

    I had the latest technology---so I really have to tip my hat to my ancestors who did this successfully with open iron sights

    Thick hardwood forests---you may get the distance of a trail to shoot---and those deer were not walking out

    I kinda chuckled at the folks who used magnum rifles to hunt deer. In most situations a shotgun with slugs or buckshot, or a .30-30/.35 Rem would be more than adequate. .45-70, too, but they didn't have enough range (insert rolling eyes.)

  • BushartBushart Senior Member Posts: 3,041 Senior Member

    @breamfisher said:

    @Bushart said:

    I cut my deer hunting teeth doing this

    I had the latest technology---so I really have to tip my hat to my ancestors who did this successfully with open iron sights

    Thick hardwood forests---you may get the distance of a trail to shoot---and those deer were not walking out

    I kinda chuckled at the folks who used magnum rifles to hunt deer. In most situations a shotgun with slugs or buckshot, or a .30-30/.35 Rem would be more than adequate. .45-70, too, but they didn't have enough range (insert rolling eyes.)

    All my ancestors used to use those old meat bruising 30/30 levers

    I've hunted with other guys using 300 win mags or 7mm mags---what a mess

    I went .06---doubled as my moose gun
    30/30 is kinda light for those

  • LandoLando Posts: 70 Member

    @bmmike said:
    https://forums.flyfisherman.com/discussion/comment/238037#Comment_238037
    Yes. The food out here, aside from steaks and burgers, is ****. Sometimes I feel like a nice bowl of pho and a few summer rolls with peanut sauce, or some lamb kabobs and grape leaves, or some of that Peruvian chicken with the jalapeño sauce, or some good crepes, or just a decent New York-style pizza — but there is none of that here. The Asian stuff, especially, I have found surprisingly difficult to prepare right myself, especially considering it seems so simple.
    Aside from that, not really.

    You can take the hipster out of the East, but the East will always be shoved up that hipster's @ss.....

    Hi, Mike. Wanna go get some tacos?

  • bmmikebmmike Posts: 541 Senior Member

    Sure! Next spring/summer when I’m over that way again.

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