Food delivery services.

MikeAMikeA Senior MemberPosts: 3,927 Senior Member
It’s just my wife and I at home now so I thought I’d try out some of the food delivery services. Since there are so many companies pushing this service now, you can get some serious discounts on the first delivery. You just have to be vigilant with your subscription and cancel it, or skip the following weeks meals. Our initial opinion of the food delivery service is that it's freaking awesome. I’ve learned so much about putting simple whole foods together to make a meal. Not just an okay meal, but food that’s better than most of the restaurants we have in our hometown. They are IMO almost as cheap as going to the grocery, Small farm, small business friendly, Fairly easy to prepare, a great teaching opportunity for wannabe cooks (me), healthy lifestyle food, portion controlled, delicious AF.

Some of the ones we have tried lisrted in order of favorites.
Peach Dish (not available up north)
Blue Apron
Sun Basket
Hello Fresh

If you haven’t tried these yet, you should.

Replies

  • Shawn C.Shawn C. Senior Member Posts: 6,867 Senior Member
    Steven tried something like that too upon moving to IA if I remember correctly. ;)
  • HextallHextall Senior Member Posts: 9,520 Senior Member
    Dominos has an app.
  • StevenSteven Senior Member Posts: 3,430 Senior Member
    Blue Apron. We started in Chicago, but it started up in Iowa just before we moved.

    $60 for three, two-person meals. Every once in awhile it's a total dud (usually due to a reliance on cauliflower) but over 95% of the time it's excellent. Last night was gnocchi with brussels sprouts.
  • MikeAMikeA Senior Member Posts: 3,927 Senior Member
    Steven wrote: »
    Blue Apron. We started in Chicago, but it started up in Iowa just before we moved.

    $60 for three, two-person meals. Every once in awhile it's a total dud (usually due to a reliance on cauliflower) but over 95% of the time it's excellent. Last night was gnocchi with brussels sprouts.

    The quality of the meats and fish has been outstanding. Hard to get that same quality at the grocery chains here.
  • Shawn C.Shawn C. Senior Member Posts: 6,867 Senior Member
    Hextall wrote: »
    Dominos has an app.

    And nothing even resembling pizza.
  • MikeAMikeA Senior Member Posts: 3,927 Senior Member
    Shawn C. wrote: »
    And nothing even resembling pizza.

    Hextall told me that the Dominos Pasta bowls were better than his favorite Italian dish. Chef Boyardee Beefaroni.
  • CO NativeCO Native Senior Member Posts: 1,525 Senior Member
    MikeA wrote: »
    , Fairly easy to prepare, a great teaching opportunity for wannabe cooks (me), healthy lifestyle food, portion controlled, delicious AF.
    That right there is fact. We tried it and have given up on it, but it was a good learning experience.
  • ricinusricinus Senior Member Posts: 6,214 Senior Member
    A good cookbook would be cheaper..

    Mike
    My new goal in life is to become an Alter Kaker...
  • StevenSteven Senior Member Posts: 3,430 Senior Member
    You could, of course, keep the recipes.

    The real advantages, at least as far as my wife is concerned, are: a) no shopping; and b) that there's no need to find and keep some of the more exotic ingredients.

    Some of the articles I've seen suggest that at $10 per meal, Blue Apron cost about twice a typical home cooked meal.
  • George KGeorge K Super Moderator Posts: 9,924 Senior Member
    Steven wrote: »
    You could, of course, keep the recipes.

    The real advantages, at least as far as my wife is concerned, are: a) no shopping; and b) that there's no need to find and keep some of the more exotic ingredients.

    Don't give up hope.

    If you spend a couple of decades in your new locale :) things may improve. When I moved to south-central Pa in 1995 chutney was an exotic rarity, now even the smallest supermarket sells stuff unheard of back then and there are Mexican stores and East and South Asian markets within a short drive. Even Tibetan and Russian stores. Oddly enough the Russian store is the sole local outlet for the best feta cheese I ever have had, and it's made in France.

    Globalization ain't so bad sometimes.
    Keep your stinkin' government hands off my Medicare.
  • StevenSteven Senior Member Posts: 3,430 Senior Member
    Even in Chicago, she didn't want to hunt down this stuff.

    Here the big hunt is for decent hummus.
  • MikeAMikeA Senior Member Posts: 3,927 Senior Member
    Steven wrote: »
    You could, of course, keep the recipes.

    The real advantages, at least as far as my wife is concerned, are: a) no shopping; and b) that there's no need to find and keep some of the more exotic ingredients.

    Some of the articles I've seen suggest that at $10 per meal, Blue Apron cost about twice a typical home cooked meal.

    Whoever wrote that obviously doesn't shop at Whole Foods. Which is where you would have to shop to get the quality ingredients that they ship with these meals. Hell When I go to the grocery with a meal in mind I always end up spending $100 and instantly regretting not just going out to eat. Three great Meals a week for two, delivered to my door for $70 is fine with me.
  • MikeAMikeA Senior Member Posts: 3,927 Senior Member
    Steven wrote: »
    Even in Chicago, she didn't want to hunt down this stuff.

    Here the big hunt is for decent hummus.
    Have you tried Boars head?
  • StevenSteven Senior Member Posts: 3,430 Senior Member
    MikeA wrote: »
    Whoever wrote that obviously doesn't shop at Whole Foods. Which is where you would have to shop to get the quality ingredients that they ship with these meals. Hell When I go to the grocery with a meal in mind I always end up spending $100 and instantly regretting not just going out to eat. Three great Meals a week for two, delivered to my door for $70 is fine with me.

    Er...I actually lived across the street from a WF the last four or five years.

    The WF in West Des Moines is tiny.
  • StevenSteven Senior Member Posts: 3,430 Senior Member
    MikeA wrote: »
    Have you tried Boars head?

    Boar's Head isn't a brand here in Iowa.

    We're partial to Sabra which isn't carried by WF and is spotty in Hy-Vee.
  • George KGeorge K Super Moderator Posts: 9,924 Senior Member
    Even a large Whole Foods by design carries a limited selection compared to, say, Wegman's, which is a full-line supermarket with some super high end sections. Fresh truffles anyone?
    Keep your stinkin' government hands off my Medicare.
  • StevenSteven Senior Member Posts: 3,430 Senior Member
    I've heard Wegman's is supposed to be amazing
  • ricinusricinus Senior Member Posts: 6,214 Senior Member
    Farmer's markets in the summer for me. In winter I just accept that produce is going to be sketchy. The biggest problem is cooking for just 2..

    Mike
    My new goal in life is to become an Alter Kaker...
  • CO NativeCO Native Senior Member Posts: 1,525 Senior Member
    Steven wrote: »
    Even in Chicago, she didn't want to hunt down this stuff.

    Here the big hunt is for decent hummus.

    Hummus is so easy to make - chick peas, olive oil, tahini for a base and then the options are endless. My wife won't even eat store bought any more, I have to make it.
  • jbillyjbilly Senior Member Posts: 5,222 Senior Member
    George K wrote: »
    Fresh truffles anyone?

    Have you tried truffle butter?
  • Shawn C.Shawn C. Senior Member Posts: 6,867 Senior Member
    Steven, if you can't find tahini for hummus you can apparently substitute peanut butter.
    Do you have a food processor? I wouldn't want to make it without one, but with it it is pretty easy.

    We buy sabra when lazy. Tasty and, quite honestly, better textured than homemade.
  • StevenSteven Senior Member Posts: 3,430 Senior Member
    the shiksa likes Sabra. I'm not going to argue.

    It looks like it's been voluntarily recalled, which explains why it disappeared. Listeria probably gave it that special taste.
  • George KGeorge K Super Moderator Posts: 9,924 Senior Member
    jbilly wrote: »
    Have you tried truffle butter?

    No. I've tried truffle oil but what I found was made with black truffles and tasted like mushrooms, nothing very special. In Italy a year or so ago we were in a small town in Tuscany having a truffle festival and had some pasta with white truffle sauce and later with white truffle oil and garlic. Those dishes were spectacular.

    The truffles in Wegman's are way beyond what I am willing or able to pay; something like $1000 a pound or so. Even buying an ounce to shave over pasta would set you back over $60.
    Keep your stinkin' government hands off my Medicare.

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