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So, is anyone not watching the "game" tonight?

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  • Hextall wrote: »
    Also, don't forget the restraint he had to exhibit to not bring up her husband's infidelity while also ignoring his own cheating ways. Only a real leader could thread such a finely eyed needle.

    Is that not the craziest?

    Its never the cheater who goes to hell. always the cheated-on.
  • HextallHextall Senior Member Posts: 9,520 Senior Member
    sherb wrote: »
    Is that not the craziest?

    Its never the cheater who goes to hell. always the cheated-on.

    Not sure if you watched it, but Trump worked the press room after the debate (many anchors said they couldn't remember a presidential candidate doing this after a general election debate... primaries, yes, but general, no)... and he repeatedly brought up how he didn't want to bring up Bill's cheating ways.

    Also, if someone brings up a man with five kids by three women he'll get called a deadbeat dad. The GOP calls him the nominee.
  • easier to point out other people's flaws if you don't have any yourself. The Donald probably figures it was his wife's fault that he cheated. Maybe she put on 5 lbs.
  • HextallHextall Senior Member Posts: 9,520 Senior Member
    I can only imagine the video that could have been put together after Lincoln/Douglas. What a time to be alive!
  • HextallHextall Senior Member Posts: 9,520 Senior Member
    sherb wrote: »
    easier to point out other people's flaws if you don't have any yourself.

    Did you just sub-post about me bringing up your beret/chacos/prius/love of Bon Jovi?

    This is some kind of **** right here.
  • tim_stim_s Senior Member Posts: 2,078 Senior Member
    Hextall wrote: »
    \
    Also, if someone brings up a man with five kids by three women he'll get called a deadbeat dad. The GOP calls him the nominee.



    totally just stole this from you
    Fly Fishing in Maine - www.flyfishinginmaine.com
  • George KGeorge K Super Moderator Posts: 10,892 Senior Member
    MikeA wrote: »
    I don't have time to explain now, but here read this.
    http://heatst.com/politics/lester-holt-the-third-debater/

    The web is like statistics or the Bible. Decide what you want to claim, then find something that makes it look plausible

    Original version:
    "At tonight’s debate, Donald Trump faced off not just against Hillary Clinton, but against moderator Lester Holt.

    The game of two-on-one saw Holt ask no questions about:

    Hillary’s emails
    Benghazi
    The Clinton Foundation"


    Edited version:
    "At tonight’s debate, Hillary Clinton faced off not just against Donald Trump, but against moderator Lester Holt.

    The game of two-on-one saw Holt ask no questions about:

    Donald's serial bankruptcies and the 3,500 lawsuits against him.
    His innumerable, demonstrable lies.
    The Trump Foundation's lack of charitable donations and blatant self dealing, which is illegal under U.S. law."

    HeatStreet seems like a really impartial and reliable journalistic resource.
    "...this low-rent Lear raging on his Twitter-heath has proven that the phrase malignant buffoon is not an oxymoron..."

    George Will
  • NZ IndicatorNZ Indicator Senior Member Posts: 11,236 Senior Member
    MikeA wrote: »
    FMLA is abused regularly and that’s unpaid FMLA. FMLA leaves the employer with a position that can’t be filled until the FMLA time limit (12 weeks) expires, and all the bureaucratic BS settles. And that’s if you’re lucky and the abuser decides to take it all at once and not whenever they just feel like a day off. Now make it 12 weeks paid time and employers will be overwhelmed with people getting illness that require them to take FMLA. Some Drs don’t mind because they get to keep the patient who also gets to keep his insurance…. The Employers will take a beating big time if that gets passed. It’ll be yuge!

    Yes, there are people who will avoid work if they can (Kevyn!!), but I think the percentage of people that abuse it is relatively low compared to those that actually need it. There will always be those trying to game the system, but the best you can do is keep them to a minimum through various requirements that prove eligibility for FMLA.
  • Shawn C.Shawn C. Senior Member Posts: 7,027 Senior Member
    Joe, Replace TANF (welfare) and food stamps in your above paragraph.

    Welcome to the Democratic Party. Your lapel pin is in the mail.
  • jbillyjbilly Senior Member Posts: 5,740 Senior Member
    Thanks for the link Chris. I'll try to check it out tonight but I just got home from a 15 day and am a bit blasted.
  • MikeAMikeA Senior Member Posts: 5,181 Senior Member
    Yes, there are people who will avoid work if they can (Kevyn!!), but I think the percentage of people that abuse it is relatively low compared to those that actually need it. There will always be those trying to game the system, but the best you can do is keep them to a minimum through various requirements that prove eligibility for FMLA.

    Sounds like you haven't ever tried to run a company and make a profit. State sponsored Welfare is for people who need it. Employer sponsored welfare will kill businesses and hurt the workforce way more than it helps.
  • NZ IndicatorNZ Indicator Senior Member Posts: 11,236 Senior Member
    Sounds like you haven't ever run into a medical illness where paid FMLA would have been beneficial to you or someone in your family.
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 10,586 Senior Member
    "Forced" FMLA. Doesn't come from Obama's stash.
  • MikeAMikeA Senior Member Posts: 5,181 Senior Member
    Guess that's why I have a savings and short and long term disability. I don't expect my employer to be responsible for my health problems if it's not related to my job. I know of someone who's dealing with a case where a person just got off FMLA and is trying to get back on it again a few months later. Why? Because that person is out of available time off and if that person misses more work, they face termination. This is just one of four cases this year out of less then 30 employees. It's f-ing ridiculous. These people aren't sick they are gaming the system. Add 12 weeks paid time off and you'll have a vacant workplace.
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 10,586 Senior Member
    **** right. My dad is looking for an excuse to retire anyway.

    Multiple employees out for weeks on end? Ha. He'd turn the lights off and lock the door.
  • Shawn C.Shawn C. Senior Member Posts: 7,027 Senior Member
    Wow, Mike, your boot straps must be just about worn out from all that pullin'.
    Consider yourself lucky that you are employed where short and long-term disability insurance is something you can afford. Also, it sounds like you work with a bunch of people named Kevyn. Sounds to me if they are lying to their boss about an FMLA situation that should be grounds for dismissal.
  • fishingcomicfishingcomic Senior Member Posts: 25,960 Senior Member
    Yes, there are people who will avoid work if they can (Kevyn!!), but I think the percentage of people that abuse it is relatively low compared to those that actually need it. There will always be those trying to game the system, but the best you can do is keep them to a minimum through various requirements that prove eligibility for FMLA.

    We had paid medical leave at the bank. From what I can tell no one abused it.
    'I've spoken of the Shining City all my political life. …In my mind it was a tall, proud city built on rocks stronger than oceans, windswept, God-blessed, and teeming with people of all kinds living in harmony and peace; a city with free ports that hummed with commerce and creativity. And if there had to be city walls, the walls had doors and the doors were open to anyone with the will and the heart to get here. That's how I saw it, and see it still.'" Ronald Reagan
  • NZ IndicatorNZ Indicator Senior Member Posts: 11,236 Senior Member
    MikeA wrote: »
    Guess that's why I have a savings and short and long term disability.

    I have the same, plus paid sick time, but not "everyone" is that lucky.
    I don't expect my employer to be responsible for my health problems if it's not related to my job.

    But I bet you expect your employer to sponsor a portion of your health insurance premium to cover health problems not related to your job yes?


    Since 2009, New Jersey has been offering workers caring for seriously ill relatives or new babies up to six weeks of payments that amount to two-thirds of their salary, capped at $595 a week. The state has granted more than 100,000 family leaves in that time, more than 80% of which were used to bond with and care for infants, according to the state's labor department.


    "Family leave insurance," as it's called, poses no direct costs to businesses, because it's entirely funded by a small (up to 60 cents per week) tax on employees. Still, there are other ways that the program could be a drag on employers. So, with a grant from the Ford Foundation, I visited as many businesses as I could find where a worker had taken a family leave in the past year and asked if the law had hurt them in any way.


    Despite the diversity of the 18 businesses I wound up visiting, which spanned the gamut from shipping to home nursing, pharmaceutical, and accounting, most of the owners or human resources managers I spoke with said the same thing: that paid leave hadn't affected how they do business. Not a single company felt it affected turnover or productivity. And while some had feared employees would take advantage of the program -- receiving benefits they weren't due, for example -- no one knew of any instances of abuse actually happening.

    http://www.cnn.com/2014/06/18/opinion/lerner-paid-family-leave/
  • MikeAMikeA Senior Member Posts: 5,181 Senior Member
    I have the same, plus paid sick time, but not "everyone" is that lucky.



    But I bet you expect your employer to sponsor a portion of your health insurance premium to cover health problems not related to your job yes?


    Since 2009, New Jersey has been offering workers caring for seriously ill relatives or new babies up to six weeks of payments that amount to two-thirds of their salary, capped at $595 a week. The state has granted more than 100,000 family leaves in that time, more than 80% of which were used to bond with and care for infants, according to the state's labor department.


    "Family leave insurance," as it's called, poses no direct costs to businesses, because it's entirely funded by a small (up to 60 cents per week) tax on employees. Still, there are other ways that the program could be a drag on employers. So, with a grant from the Ford Foundation, I visited as many businesses as I could find where a worker had taken a family leave in the past year and asked if the law had hurt them in any way.


    Despite the diversity of the 18 businesses I wound up visiting, which spanned the gamut from shipping to home nursing, pharmaceutical, and accounting, most of the owners or human resources managers I spoke with said the same thing: that paid leave hadn't affected how they do business. Not a single company felt it affected turnover or productivity. And while some had feared employees would take advantage of the program -- receiving benefits they weren't due, for example -- no one knew of any instances of abuse actually happening.

    http://www.cnn.com/2014/06/18/opinion/lerner-paid-family-leave/

    My health and benefits package is part of my total compensation package provided to me in exchange for my services. They don't give me anything.

    I just posted that there are several cases of abuse out of a group of >30 (who also have ltd and std insurance). It's not a probability that it would be abused in a facility like where I'm employed. It's a fact.
  • MikeAMikeA Senior Member Posts: 5,181 Senior Member
    Shawn C. wrote: »
    Wow, Mike, your boot straps must be just about worn out from all that pullin'.
    Consider yourself lucky that you are employed where short and long-term disability insurance is something you can afford. Also, it sounds like you work with a bunch of people named Kevyn. Sounds to me if they are lying to their boss about an FMLA situation that should be grounds for dismissal.

    Well, I've worked from the very bottom as a laborer, to the upper crust over 21 years. A really poor TN education,,,, No degree, self taught programmer, earned an engineering position in one of the largest manufacturing businesses in North America. Now I'm in management and learning those ropes. No way did I think 20 something years ago that I would end up where I'm at. So yea, my boot straps are pretty **** tight.

    In this instance The boss has nothing to with the FMLA claim. It's taken care of at the HR level. It's between the HR rep and the medical professionals who recommend the FMLA. Medical professionals who realize that patients need that insurance

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