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Dog Obedience

Shawn C.Shawn C. Senior MemberPosts: 7,027 Senior Member
Ok, my Labrador Retriever is now 19 months old. She is great; we truly love her and she is such a kind soul. She likes everyone and is just great with the neighborhood kids. This is one of the reasons we chose a Labrador.
One of the other appealing characteristics was their ability to be trained by novice dog owners. She did learn all of her commands quickly and has retained all of them from her puppy classes. However, she has started to take off on us when we let her off leash. Her recall is getting really bad. I can keep her in the yard if I have treats with me (she's very food-driven) or when we play fetch with the tennis ball. Other than that, she just wanders off and will not listen to the commands to come back to either of us. She isn't running away from anything or really hauling ****, it just looks like she wants to explore and sniff around. Well, last week she made it out of the neighborhood and almost into the 4 lanes of main-street busy traffic as my wife chased her. Her wanderings are getting to be more frequent; to the point where she is rarely off leash, which sucks.
I sure would appreciate any recommendations as we are concerned about her safety. Also, I would like to hike with her off leash (we were able to do this last summer) but would not even attempt it at this point with her new-found wanderlust.

Replies

  • BufordBuford Senior Member Posts: 3,119 Senior Member
    You can always use a shock collar, you need to break her of this before the inevitable happens.
    Just look at the flowers Lizzie just look at the flowers.
  • ricinusricinus Senior Member Posts: 6,210 Senior Member
    Shawn,

    Maybe get some professional advice. "Come" is the most difficult command and probably the most important..

    Mike
    My new goal in life is to become an Alter Kaker...
  • flytrapflytrap Banned Posts: 1,659 Senior Member
    +1 on the shock collar. Yeah, it seems mean, but nowhere near as mean as a car hitting your dog.
  • seppalaseppala Senior Member Posts: 1,916 Senior Member
    Shawn,

    I had a English Setter that liked to range. Took her hiking in Montana her second year and she stuck with me. The next year, however, she'd roam pretty far. She always came back, but on her own schedule. We lived in a cabin on a dead end road, so she could go wherever she wanted without fear of cars, but once she didn't return for 24 hours. It got down to 6 degrees that night - my wife and I were nervous wrecks.

    It was Stuck_in_Kansas who gave me advice. I got a shock collar with 5 settings. Only once did I turn it above the lowest (she was chasing deer). The lowest gets their attention without hurting them. I tried it on myself and it's not painful, just uncomfortable. If she ranged, I'd yell for her to come - when she didn't listen, I'd zap her once and she'd turn right around. Good collars even have a setting where there's no zap, just a signal. After a couple weeks, that ended up working for me.

    With all that said, however, I'd still get a professional's opinion. Just last October, at seven years old, the little **** got out of the backyard and ended up getting hit.
  • HextallHextall Senior Member Posts: 9,520 Senior Member
    Have you tried reasoning with the dog? Explaining to her that you're an overbearing Hitleresque task master and that she's your Jew?
  • flytrapflytrap Banned Posts: 1,659 Senior Member
    Had to laugh at seppala's testing the collar on himself. Had one on one of my dogs, had the control in my pocket as I was driving. Of course the damned pooch tried to jump in my lap and stepped on the control...we were both wondering what the hell just happened, lol.
  • ricinusricinus Senior Member Posts: 6,210 Senior Member
    We had a Collie cross we tried the shock collar on. It didn't take long for her to figure out where the shock came from.. Collar on good as gold, collar off back to square one..

    Mike
    My new goal in life is to become an Alter Kaker...
  • fishingcomicfishingcomic Senior Member Posts: 26,555 Senior Member
    My Uncle had one of those invisible fences for his dog. They were very popular in the Rochester area because no one fences in their yards. My young cousin put one of the collars on the neighbor kid. Fortunately my Uncle caught her just before she talked him into crossing the fence line.

    BTW my dog is very good at obeying the come command except when he gets out of the front yard. Once his nose hits the ground and he is on the run he is a PIA. I just do everything to not let him out of the yard without a leash. But if someone has an idea that does not involve a shock collar, I would appreciate it.
    'I've spoken of the Shining City all my political life. …In my mind it was a tall, proud city built on rocks stronger than oceans, windswept, God-blessed, and teeming with people of all kinds living in harmony and peace; a city with free ports that hummed with commerce and creativity. And if there had to be city walls, the walls had doors and the doors were open to anyone with the will and the heart to get here. That's how I saw it, and see it still.'" Ronald Reagan
  • seppalaseppala Senior Member Posts: 1,916 Senior Member
    ricinus wrote: »
    We had a Collie cross we tried the shock collar on. It didn't take long for her to figure out where the shock came from.. Collar on good as gold, collar off back to square one..

    Mike

    True for mine as well.
  • Shawn C.Shawn C. Senior Member Posts: 7,027 Senior Member
    I'm a bit confused as to how a shock collar makes the dog pay attention to the owners. If I'm walking down the street and get struck by lightning I'm not going to start wondering if my wife was trying to get me to mow the lawn.
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 10,585 Senior Member
    seppala wrote: »
    Shawn,

    I had a English Setter that liked to range. Took her hiking in Montana her second year and she stuck with me. The next year, however, she'd roam pretty far. She always came back, but on her own schedule. We lived in a cabin on a dead end road, so she could go wherever she wanted without fear of cars, but once she didn't return for 24 hours. It got down to 6 degrees that night - my wife and I were nervous wrecks.

    It was Stuck_in_Kansas who gave me advice. I got a shock collar with 5 settings. Only once did I turn it above the lowest (she was chasing deer). The lowest gets their attention without hurting them. I tried it on myself and it's not painful, just uncomfortable. If she ranged, I'd yell for her to come - when she didn't listen, I'd zap her once and she'd turn right around. Good collars even have a setting where there's no zap, just a signal. After a couple weeks, that ended up working for me.

    With all that said, however, I'd still get a professional's opinion. Just last October, at seven years old, the little **** got out of the backyard and ended up getting hit.
    I am known for liking to get shocked. I'll do it on a dare or just to satisfy my own curiosity.

    I've done the dog collars with the 5 settings. #5 took my legs out from under me.

    Electric fences are no bother if you know how to do it. Put both hands on the fence while wearing shoes. Feels like a muscle twitch.

    But the worst was the cattle prod. Did it to myself. Put the prongs on either side of my Achilles tendon. I remember the everything going black and my hip hurt from the involuntary kick, and my throat hurt because I tried to scream but it came out garbled. Almost like the Hulk rammed his fist down my throat and ripped the scream out.

    I have a cousin that just got deputized. He said he will let me ride the tazer after he's been on the force a while.
  • Shawn C.Shawn C. Senior Member Posts: 7,027 Senior Member
    I've been known to lick the occasional 9-volt battery, but you, my friend, may want to seek professional help. :cool:
  • seppalaseppala Senior Member Posts: 1,916 Senior Member
    Shawn C. wrote: »
    I'm a bit confused as to how a shock collar makes the dog pay attention to the owners. If I'm walking down the street and get struck by lightning I'm not going to start wondering if my wife was trying to get me to mow the lawn.

    I wondered that too, but it works. They just know. I think part of it is that they're coming to you because they're uncomfortable - but this theory only works if you're good to your dog.

    If you're an **** and it works, I don't know.
  • seppalaseppala Senior Member Posts: 1,916 Senior Member
    I tried to turn a cattle prod into a fish shocker. It didn't work.

    I knew a guy that caught the electric fence right across the forehead. He said he dropped like a ton of bricks.
  • fishingcomicfishingcomic Senior Member Posts: 26,555 Senior Member
    Shawn C. wrote: »
    I've been known to lick the occasional 9-volt battery, but you, my friend, may want to seek professional help. :cool:

    Or at the very least donate your brain to science.
    'I've spoken of the Shining City all my political life. …In my mind it was a tall, proud city built on rocks stronger than oceans, windswept, God-blessed, and teeming with people of all kinds living in harmony and peace; a city with free ports that hummed with commerce and creativity. And if there had to be city walls, the walls had doors and the doors were open to anyone with the will and the heart to get here. That's how I saw it, and see it still.'" Ronald Reagan
  • jbillyjbilly Senior Member Posts: 6,017 Senior Member
    Buffco wrote: »
    I am known for liking to get shocked. I'll do it on a dare or just to satisfy my own curiosity.

    I've done the dog collars with the 5 settings. #5 took my legs out from under me.

    Electric fences are no bother if you know how to do it. Put both hands on the fence while wearing shoes. Feels like a muscle twitch.


    But the worst was the cattle prod. Did it to myself. Put the prongs on either side of my Achilles tendon. I remember the everything going black and my hip hurt from the involuntary kick, and my throat hurt because I tried to scream but it came out garbled. Almost like the Hulk rammed his fist down my throat and ripped the scream out.

    I have a cousin that just got deputized. He said he will let me ride the tazer after he's been on the force a while.

    At what point did you become straight and declare the therapy a success? :cool:
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 6,294 Senior Member
    I've talked with an officer who got a tazer hit (they have to if they want to carry them.) He said the first thing to tighten up was his anal sphincter. Which is good because he'd eaten some beef and bean burritos before the training.

    Unfortunately the last thing to relax on him was the sphincter. He said 3 hours later it was still twitching and tingling.


    You may enjoy it.
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 10,585 Senior Member
    Stop it. I can only get so erect.

    Anal twitching sounds glorious.
  • fishingcomicfishingcomic Senior Member Posts: 26,555 Senior Member
    i've talked with an officer who got a tazer hit (they have to if they want to carry them.) he said the first thing to tighten up was his anal sphincter. Which is good because he'd eaten some beef and bean burritos before the training.

    Unfortunately the last thing to relax on him was the sphincter. He said 3 hours later it was still twitching and tingling.


    You may enjoy it.

    potd
    .....
    'I've spoken of the Shining City all my political life. …In my mind it was a tall, proud city built on rocks stronger than oceans, windswept, God-blessed, and teeming with people of all kinds living in harmony and peace; a city with free ports that hummed with commerce and creativity. And if there had to be city walls, the walls had doors and the doors were open to anyone with the will and the heart to get here. That's how I saw it, and see it still.'" Ronald Reagan
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 10,585 Senior Member
    jbilly wrote: »
    At what point did you become straight and declare the therapy a success? :cool:
    It's still ongoing brother.
  • Shawn C.Shawn C. Senior Member Posts: 7,027 Senior Member
    seppala wrote: »

    If you're an **** and it works, I don't know.

    My dog is spoiled. Probably a bit (way) too much and she knows she's part of the family. It's weird, I know she likes us but she sure as **** doesn't live for us. She is her own dog and very, very independent. Not cuddly at all either. I sometimes hear that Labs really like to please their people. I honestly have no idea what this even means.

    So, does the shock collar have a small remote? If the dog is really bad can I hook it up to a portable generator?

    Also, regarding contacting an 'expert': We did her two puppy courses through Petco and the girl that is the dog trainer was great. However, even when we take the dog to Petco now she knows she is going to get treats from her, so she would walk through a wall of fire to come to her.

    Also, I think the dog needs some training/repetition in an environment where she isn't sure we are doing a training session (ie. getting treats).
  • Shawn C.Shawn C. Senior Member Posts: 7,027 Senior Member
    jbilly wrote: »
    At what point did you become straight and declare the therapy a success? :cool:

    When he stops harassing Sherb.
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 10,585 Senior Member
    FWIW I can't stand labs. Perpetual puppies.

    I want another German Shepherd.
    And I still miss Frank, my dachshund.
  • fishingcomicfishingcomic Senior Member Posts: 26,555 Senior Member
    Best dog I ever had was a shepherd mix. A dachshund once bit my sister's face, so I have mixed feelings.
    'I've spoken of the Shining City all my political life. …In my mind it was a tall, proud city built on rocks stronger than oceans, windswept, God-blessed, and teeming with people of all kinds living in harmony and peace; a city with free ports that hummed with commerce and creativity. And if there had to be city walls, the walls had doors and the doors were open to anyone with the will and the heart to get here. That's how I saw it, and see it still.'" Ronald Reagan
  • seppalaseppala Senior Member Posts: 1,916 Senior Member
    The collar has a remote. Honestly, there's no reason to ever turn it all the way up unless she's about to get hit by a car.

    My setter was schizophrenic - when she was outside, the only thing she wanted to do was get on birds, but when she was inside with me she was as cuddly a dog as I've ever had.

    Joe has a lab. He should chime in.
  • jbillyjbilly Senior Member Posts: 6,017 Senior Member
    Do you guys think these collars would work on pigs? Could they be trained not to run away from a naked ginger who practices his own form of animal husbandry?

    (asking for a friend as part of his therapy program)
  • flytrapflytrap Banned Posts: 1,659 Senior Member
    I understand pigs are very intelligent animals, despite their grooming habits. Now, maybe, if you put the collar on the naked ginger the results might be more dramatic.
  • Shawn C.Shawn C. Senior Member Posts: 7,027 Senior Member
    Thanks for the book recommendations, Joe.
    Short update, yesterday we hiked with her for about three miles. Middle of nowhere and nobody on the trails so we had her off leash most of the time. I had a baggie full of treats so she would only roam so far and responded well to commands. Today was a different matter. She was the hell-dog.
    As far as professional help, what should I be looking for?


    Sent from my ObamaPhone using Tapatalk

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