Popular Science shuts down online comments

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Replies

  • yataheyyatahey Senior Member Posts: 5,605 Senior Member
    joekrz wrote: »
    That's all they are. Nothing more. Nothing less. PS seems to have made a mountain out of a mole hill.

    If they didn't think it was important they wouldn't have taken such a drastic step.
    "When the goin gets weird, the weird turn pro." Hunter S. Thompson
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 4,974 Senior Member
    I think this could do more harm than good. It could backfire, with those opposed to the ideas which generate so much false controversy claiming "victory" because rather than get into an argument, Popular Science has decided not to allow comments. In many ways, the editorial staff of the magazine is behaving in the same manner as the religious and political nuts that it's trying to deny a stage to, and has only increased their opportunities, in my opinion. As has been alluded to before, science has long had its detractors and an antagonistic relationship with those in various spheres of power.
  • Shawn C.Shawn C. Senior Member Posts: 7,027 Senior Member
    Ok, boys. Time to name Yatahey's band!!!
  • yataheyyatahey Senior Member Posts: 5,605 Senior Member
    Maybe. I think they just got fed up with the same antagonistic voice that is prevalent in political discussion that tries to push an unscientific agenda at the expense of scientific methods.
    "When the goin gets weird, the weird turn pro." Hunter S. Thompson
  • yataheyyatahey Senior Member Posts: 5,605 Senior Member
    Shawn C. wrote: »
    Ok, boys. Time to name Yatahey's band!!!

    We have a name, thanks anyway. I'll not divulge it here.
    "When the goin gets weird, the weird turn pro." Hunter S. Thompson
  • FishTXFishTX Super Moderator Posts: 8,171 Senior Member
    Shawn C. wrote: »
    Ok, boys. Time to name Yatahey's band!!!

    The agnostic physicists.
    "We have to find someone who can not only fly this plane, but who didn't have fish for dinner."

    Crooow:This music would work better with women in bikinis shaking all over the place. I guess that's true of any music really.
  • I think this could do more harm than good. It could backfire, with those opposed to the ideas which generate so much false controversy claiming "victory" because rather than get into an argument, Popular Science has decided not to allow comments. In many ways, the editorial staff of the magazine is behaving in the same manner as the religious and political nuts that it's trying to deny a stage to, and has only increased their opportunities, in my opinion. As has been alluded to before, science has long had its detractors and an antagonistic relationship with those in various spheres of power.


    Does the forum at S/A have a disclaimer? Saying that the views expressed are not to be viewed as true to the scientific method? There are some fools out in this world that believe anything that exists on the interwebs is the truth.
  • Shawn C. wrote: »
    Ok, boys. Time to name Yatahey's band!!!

    Based on his avatar I think it's "Male Cats without Junk".
  • yataheyyatahey Senior Member Posts: 5,605 Senior Member
    FishTX wrote: »
    The agnostic physicists.

    I was leaning toward The Four Nickators but somebody already has that name.
    "When the goin gets weird, the weird turn pro." Hunter S. Thompson
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 4,974 Senior Member
    greenman wrote: »
    Does the forum at S/A have a disclaimer? Saying that the views expressed are not to be viewed as true to the scientific method? There are some fools out in this world that believe anything that exists on the interwebs is the truth.
    Dunno. You have to register.

    There have been fools that believe anything forwarded is truth. It's not a novelty unique to the internet. Nor is it unique to science. Look at politics and the debate over health care and the budget.
  • NZ IndicatorNZ Indicator Senior Member Posts: 10,497 Senior Member
    yatahey wrote: »
    If they didn't think it was important they wouldn't have taken such a drastic step.

    Drastic or dumb?

    The articles are written by non-academic journalists. Not scientists.

    Science and writing about science are not the same thing.
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 10,586 Senior Member
    yatahey wrote: »
    How would you like your mechanic giving you advice on your health?

    Lol. You can't be thinking this all the way through.

    Who's going to listen to their mechanic's advice on health matters?
  • NZ IndicatorNZ Indicator Senior Member Posts: 10,497 Senior Member
    Whaddya mean? I always visit my mechanic to check my blood pressure and cholesterol levels. I have an OBD2 port on the back of my neck.
  • Shawn C.Shawn C. Senior Member Posts: 7,027 Senior Member
    Buffco wrote: »
    Lol. You can't be thinking this all the way through.

    Who's going to listen to their mechanic's advice on health matters?

    Probably the same idiots that listen to a talk radio host's 'opinion' on climate change or their revisionist history.
    I get what you're saying though; Yat overplayed his hand on this one for sure. Apples and oranges.


    Sent from my ObamaPhone using Tapatalk
  • yataheyyatahey Senior Member Posts: 5,605 Senior Member
    Take a look at your sig line Shawn. That same lack of critical thinking has an agenda to bring science down to the level of superstition. Look at Texas and how they are rewriting text books. If you don't put a stop to the madness you'll wind up with Jesus rode a dinosaur being taught in public school.

    And I wouldn't want my mechanic giving me medical advice any more than I would want a Christian Scientist telling me medical science is not needed because it's God's will that I'm sick and I need to pray harder.
    "When the goin gets weird, the weird turn pro." Hunter S. Thompson
  • yataheyyatahey Senior Member Posts: 5,605 Senior Member
    Texas changes textbooks:

    "In one of the most significant changes leading up to the vote, the board attempted to water down the rationale for the separation of church and state"

    "During the monthslong revision process, conservatives strengthened requirements on teaching the Judeo-Christian influences of the nation's Founding Fathers and required that the U.S. government be referred to as a "constitutional republic," rather than "democratic."'

    "they also rejected language to modernize the classification of historic periods to B.C.E. and C.E. from the traditional B.C. and A.D., and agreed to replace Thomas Jefferson as an example of an influential political philosopher in a world history class. They also required students to evaluate efforts by global organizations such as the United Nations to undermine U.S. sovereignty."

    "They have ignored historians and teachers, allowing ideological activists to push the culture war further into our classrooms," said Rep. Mike Villareal, a Democrat. "They fail to understand that we don't want liberal textbooks or conservative textbooks. We want excellent textbooks, written by historians instead of activists."
    http://www.nbcnews.com/id/37271857/ns/us_news-life/t/texas-oks-school-textbook-changes/#.UkbH2D-E4VE

    Yeah. I don't want these fanatical ideologues writing my textbooks, claiming science is a hoax, or weakening the separation of church and State. If they want to indoctrinate their own spawn in fantasy, let them home school.

    http://www.nbcnews.com/id/37271857/ns/us_news-life/t/texas-oks-school-textbook-changes/#.UkbH2D-E4VE
    "When the goin gets weird, the weird turn pro." Hunter S. Thompson
  • yataheyyatahey Senior Member Posts: 5,605 Senior Member
    Here's another run down of how Texas thinks education should be taught:

    Saying Senator Joe McCarthy was correct to charge that the U.S. government was infiltrated by communists.

    Refusing to include Latino figures like Cesar Chavez as role models.

    Saying Thomas Jefferson did not play a major role among the founding fathers, and removing him from a list of figures whose writings inspired late-18th-century and 19th-century revolutions elsewhere.

    Requiring teaching that the country’s founding fathers were all Christians.

    Questioning the separation of church and state and refusing an amendment declaring that, “the founding fathers protected religious freedom in America by barring the government from promoting or disfavoring any particular religion above all others.”

    Ordering that the word “capitalism” be replaced in all textbooks with the “free-enterprise system.”

    Ordering the teaching of “the conservative resurgence of the 1980s and 1990s, including Phyllis Schlafly, the Contract With America, the Heritage Foundation, the Moral Majority and the National Rifle Association.”

    Ordering that students should study “the unintended consequences” of the Great Society legislation, affirmative action and Title IX legislation.

    The Board now requires textbooks to teach “the importance of personal responsibility for life choices” when discussing dating violence, sexuality, drug use, eating disorders and suicide. A board member said, “The topic of sociology tends to blame society for everything.”
    "When the goin gets weird, the weird turn pro." Hunter S. Thompson
  • swizzswizz Senior Member Posts: 2,567 Senior Member
    Don't mess with Texas
    All of your Trout are belong to me.
  • Scott ButnerScott Butner Senior Member Posts: 3,918 Senior Member
    sherb wrote: »
    Bad move. Stupid and antithetical to the spirit that undergirds the scientific enterprise.

    This has been bothering me all week, but I had forgotten about it until I found this article, which expresses my points better than I could hope to do.

    http://www.slate.com/blogs/future_tense/2013/09/25/popular_science_says_comments_bad_for_science_shuts_them_off_bad_move.html

    As a student of the history of science, and someone who (while trained as an engineer) worked in the scientific research community for nearly three decades, I've got to point out that, unlike politics or religion or art, in science there IS a privileged perspective/viewpoint and it is an essential part of the scientific process. We move forward at a rate that is much greater than other ways of knowing the world precisely BECAUSE we don't continually re-open settled issues for debate. That's quite different than shutting down debate -- nothing in science is ever "settled" forever -- but it raises the bar considerably on overturning that which has been settled via experiment and observation. As a result, changes in science -- even revolutionary ones like quantum theory -- rarely REPLACE established science so much as they supplement it. Newton is still intact 350 years later, even though Einstein showed that Newton's theories are totally inadequate to explain motion and gravity "at the extremes" (i.e., in reference frames other than our own).

    Pop Sci's rationale was/is that the comments, rather than enhancing the public's understanding of the issues, actually REDUCED the public's understanding of what they were publishing. If your mission is to bring the latest information about scientific advances to the public in understandable terms, that's pretty much antithetical to the process.
  • Shawn C.Shawn C. Senior Member Posts: 7,027 Senior Member
    Yat: I was just saying that jumping to car mechanics giving medical advice was a bit much. You know enough about me to realize which side of this argument I stand on.
    Sherb: the points made above about the TX Board of Education should give you pause, no? Don't you think that one of the cornerstones of a healthy democracy is an educated public? I stand behind my comment the other day where I stated that the far right's attacks on science and intellectualism are very frightening to me.


    Sent from my ObamaPhone using Tapatalk
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 4,974 Senior Member
    Speaking of attacks on education and such....

    Any of y'all's states shifting or recently shifted to "common core" standards for primary education? Florida is, and you should see some of the blow-up on this....
  • Speaking of attacks on education and such....

    Any of y'all's states shifting or recently shifted to "common core" standards for primary education? Florida is, and you should see some of the blow-up on this....

    Yes or at least we are trying to. Lack of funds because building new stadiums is more important than education.


    http://www.usnews.com/news/articles/2013/08/27/minnesota-reading-scores-plummet-in-common-core-assessments

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