What do you do, when you come across somebody that doesn't have a clue...

...fishing I mean (not the Lodge).

You run into a person that has no idea what the heck they're doing. Do you say anything besides "hey, how you doing?"

Replies

  • JulietJuliet Posts: 0
    If they ask for help, I'll give it. If not, I just let them flail away. I'm good either way.
  • JulietJuliet Posts: 0
    sherb wrote: »
    If they ask for help, I'll give it. If not, I just let them flail away. I'm good either way.

    I let a guy on Saturday flail away (actually he was just dangling something downstream under a bridge - not even giving any action to whatever he had on). I did tell the guy that there were some fish rising about two hours earlier to BWOs in the pool right above him. He just said that he had tried that pool the night before, hadn't got anything so wasn't going to try again.
  • Brian D.Brian D. Senior Member Posts: 4,011 Senior Member
    Depends on my mood. Occasionally, I'll stop and chat with someone and even offer them some flies. Many other days I just watch in amusement for a sec and move on. If I stopped for every clueless doofus on the river around here, I'd never get to make a cast.

    bd
  • JulietJuliet Posts: 0
    Ya, I usually offer a few flies that are working. People don't know what they don't know. . .you know?
  • ScottPScottP Senior Member Posts: 480 Senior Member
    I was fishing in Yellowstone one time, had just finished catching a few fish in a run and was taking a break before moving on. A guy started in where I'd been and I watched him for a while; as bad as I am, he was a whole lot worse and he was pretty much just flogging the water to no good effect. I started to talk to him, pointed out a few good spots to try (the fish were still actively feeding), but he couldn't see them since he didn't have sunglasses (sigh), so I gave him a couple foam beetles that had been working very well that day, told him to stand up by the head of the riffle, hit the water anywhere within the general vicinity and watch for a strike where the water changed color. I headed off for another stretch; never did see if he caught anything.
    They say the times are changing but I just don't know
  • TrootfisherTrootfisher Senior Member Posts: 901 Senior Member
    I stop and chat with people, and will offer advice if they ask or if it seems like they want to ask but won't. I think everyone should be out there having fun and catching fish.

    I unfortunately have some days here and there where I couldn't catch a fish to save my life and have had complete snobs refuse to give up any info. Not everyone shares the same outlook that I mentioned above.
  • ouzelproouzelpro Senior Member Posts: 5,361 Senior Member
    See, this is why I rarely guide; if I had a clueless and unresponsive client, I would probably choke him to death, then bury him near the river. This would be counterproductive.
  • ricinusricinus Senior Member Posts: 6,214 Senior Member
    If they are at a REALLY GOOD pool, I'll tell them the fishing is better downstream, give them some of my Ebay $5/dozen flies and send them on their way.

    Mike
    My new goal in life is to become an Alter Kaker...
  • nimrodnimrod Senior Member Posts: 756 Senior Member
    ...I know, ain't it awful. The poor slobs drive all the way from Illinois to fish the world renowned driftless area and can't even buy a trout. I see it all the time. They get all excited, forget everything they learned casting at the local class or on their lawn...cast to the fish they scared that are scurrying all over. Then, just when they think the fish are uncatchable...some local yahoo,steps into a riffle and pulls out half a dozen nice browns. Just trying to help them out, ya know...drive 'em even more crazy. Me...I always hand out a couple of caddis emergers and tell 'em to give up on casting and just hang it downstream in a riffle. If I remember, I show them how to use a slipstrike...if I forget, I always get a good chuckle later on thinking on how even more nuts I must have drove them. Truth for fishing the spring creeks of the driftless...slower is always better, but casting is everything. Sometimes ya just gotta spare folks the truth...
  • Yeah, yeah, yeah.

    You go out of your way to teach people the secret of the emerging scud.

    Guy was trying for the fish underneath the bridge at JJ. Good luck with that.

    New buns at Pat's! The world's best hamburger just got better.
  • PrimeliesPrimelies Junior Member Posts: 13 Junior Member
    Helped two college age guys once, gave them flies, showed them how to tie them on, even gave casting advice. 30 minutes later DOW showed up, asked both of them for licenses, gave them tickets and told em to beat feet. She then stood there watching me fish for a minute. Asked her if she wanted to see me license, she said no and left.... go figure.

    Usually I lie if I am asked how the fishing is. Whatever it is I say the opposite. My kids dont get it.
  • sherb wrote: »
    If they ask for help, I'll give it. If not, I just let them flail away. I'm good either way.
    ditto

    if as sometimes happens they approach me and say 'I'm new' mind if I ask you something I will gladly help out and have at times spent the rest of the day fishing with them and showing them the river

    otherwise I might exchange cordialities but otherwise leave them alone ... if they don't know what they are doing but begin telling you 'how it is' then I definitely move along
  • ScottP wrote: »
    I was fishing in Yellowstone one time, .... he was pretty much just flogging the water to no good effect.

    people flogging the water in Yellowstone are da bestest

    Greenman and I were fishing the park a couple years back and apparently Xanterra had hired a couple of 'guides' for their guests to hire. We were on Soda Butte and working our way downstream when we happened upon a guide with a group flailing away on a nice run. I didn't approach but stood and watched from about 100 yards away while the guide gave me the stink eye.

    The run and bend were just below the road so as they finished coming up empty handed and stomped thru the run and went up to the van sitting right above the water I continued fishing along and got down into the bend chucking hoppers ... as they were removing their waders and watching I proceeded to pull a nice 17 inch cuttie out of the same run as he performed a death from above take on my hopper

    the trout gods had decided to smile upon me

    :D
  • ouzelproouzelpro Senior Member Posts: 5,361 Senior Member
    Da trouts cain't hep it. They's naturally aytracted to you afetr trying to eat Monkey Vindaloo.
  • another batch gettin **** up this weekend!

    vishnu to you tooo
  • nimrodnimrod Senior Member Posts: 756 Senior Member
    After 20 years of teaching FF classes that ended with a day on the spring creeks I developed a habit of reaching in and setting the hook without them even knowing I did it. But...They still have to cast. Ya gotta watch out at Pats...it was only a couple of years ago two local brothers took a guy outside and beat him to death. He was from Illinois...but, at least he had a cabin up here. I'm only bothered by my fib friends when they come all the way up here and don't stop by to fish with me. Honestly, haven't been out in a month...I pretty much just stop at a bridge and count how many I could have caught if I wet a line. They are still stacked up in the riffles taking caddis larvae. And, there are no fish under the JJ bridge...what a nimrod!
  • I drove by a couple of times. If anybody was out, I would have stopped.

    I remember that. Did that really happen at Pat's? And if I remember, nobody was arrested?
  • Brian D.Brian D. Senior Member Posts: 4,011 Senior Member
    Ya gotta watch out at Pats...it was only a couple of years ago two local brothers took a guy outside and beat him to death.

    Back in my bar band days, someone got stabbed to death at a honky tonk one time while we were playing. Nobody even realized it at the time. A big fight broke out, and one guy apparently got stabbed and crawled out the side door. Nobody saw him, and apparently he crawled out by the dumpsters behind the building and bled out. That's where the bar owner found him the next morning.

    We all thought it was just a regular fight, and after it got broken up, nobody mentioned that the guy in question was unaccounted for. We just kept playing. The bar got shut down after the dead guy was found - it was a pretty rough place, and it was probably inevitable that something like that was going to happen. It sucked because we always made good money playing there, and there was this group of bisexual trailer trash **** girls who hung out there, and they would dirty dance and grind on each other while the music was playing, which was top-of-the-line entertainment for the band.

    bd
  • I first always realize that there are times that I don’t have a clue regardless of my experience. I have seen some on the water who may wish to pillage, crowd, and do whatever necessary to advance their cause on the water. Other times, there are those who work hard to know more, have a positive ethical approach, but still might need assistance.

    I suppose it takes wisdom at times to determine when to assist others and if they actually want help. I believe that being generally approachable whether through body language or casual conversation reveals much about a situation.

    Looking for opportunities to be there for others is a great way to live and accepting help from others can make me even better at it. Learning to keep my pride in check whether helping or accepting help has been an exercise of growth for me.
  • As others have mentioned here I will sometimes stop and watch. If someone asks I'll give them some advice. e.g. Trico hatch. Some people refuse to go any smaller in tippet than 5x. When I tell them I fished 7 and 8x esp when drifting a fly downstream in slack water they can't wrap their head about it. Some lessons are learned the hard way and sometimes never at all.
  • AboutFlyFishingAboutFlyFishing Junior Member Posts: 4 Junior Member
    Interesting post - I remember about 30 years ago, having an interest in fly fishing - picked up a cheap outfit at the Sportsmen's show, a couple of books, and some information on fly tying. I was 17 years old. I knew lots about spin fishing, but in my parts, very few people fly fished. Lessons were way too expensive for me back then.

    I owned the cheapest hip waders you could buy (on a part time dairy farm labourer's wage, you can't buy much).

    I drive out to a river and as they say, started flailing about on it, line tangles, nothing working for me. If it wasn't for a very kind gentleman, who walked over to where I was (I felt quite embarrassed - and embarrassment has a way of making my inner shyness come to the surface in spades), and he started some small talk with me, looked at my flies and offered me a couple that he said "might" work better than what I was using.

    He checked out the rod I was using, and said something like, "Ya know, I've never used one of those before, may I have a couple of casts with it?" I handed him the rod, and as he used it, he said things like, "Hey, this isn't too bad considering the price of it. I think I'll get one of these for my wife for the odd time she comes out. No point in spending tons of money if she'll only use it once or twice a year," and he chuckled and made me feel good about the equipment I had.

    Then, instead of telling me what to do, or how to cast it better, he said something like, "Here's what _I_ like to do when I'm casting... " and spent about five minutes showing me how HE would cast the rod... and telling me why _he_ uses a fly rod the way he does.

    I watched, listened, after a few minutes he meandered down the river, and after that little lesson, I better understood what was going on and instead of an afternoon and evening of frustrating tangles, I caught a fish! Mind you, I wasn't casting any huge distances or anything like that, but if it was not for the kindness of that gentleman, I might never have tried fly fishing again.
  • ricinusricinus Senior Member Posts: 6,214 Senior Member
    Great story and I don't think I've heard a more diplomatic way of helping someone new. I'm going to have to remember it for future use. Thanks.

    Mike
    My new goal in life is to become an Alter Kaker...
  • AboutFlyFishingAboutFlyFishing Junior Member Posts: 4 Junior Member
    Thanks, Mike. I myself sometimes forget how embarrassed I was my first time ever trying fly fishing (heck, for quite a few times after as well!). No one wants to feel like a fool or a rookie, and often it just takes a few minutes of diplomacy to help someone out. They'll never forget you if you do.

    Ian
  • Interesting post - I remember about 30 years ago, having an interest in fly fishing - picked up a cheap outfit at the Sportsmen's show, a couple of books, and some information on fly tying. I was 17 years old. I knew lots about spin fishing, but in my parts, very few people fly fished. Lessons were way too expensive for me back then.

    I owned the cheapest hip waders you could buy (on a part time dairy farm labourer's wage, you can't buy much).

    I drive out to a river and as they say, started flailing about on it, line tangles, nothing working for me. If it wasn't for a very kind gentleman, who walked over to where I was (I felt quite embarrassed - and embarrassment has a way of making my inner shyness come to the surface in spades), and he started some small talk with me, looked at my flies and offered me a couple that he said "might" work better than what I was using.

    He checked out the rod I was using, and said something like, "Ya know, I've never used one of those before, may I have a couple of casts with it?" I handed him the rod, and as he used it, he said things like, "Hey, this isn't too bad considering the price of it. I think I'll get one of these for my wife for the odd time she comes out. No point in spending tons of money if she'll only use it once or twice a year," and he chuckled and made me feel good about the equipment I had.

    Then, instead of telling me what to do, or how to cast it better, he said something like, "Here's what _I_ like to do when I'm casting... " and spent about five minutes showing me how HE would cast the rod... and telling me why _he_ uses a fly rod the way he does.

    I watched, listened, after a few minutes he meandered down the river, and after that little lesson, I better understood what was going on and instead of an afternoon and evening of frustrating tangles, I caught a fish! Mind you, I wasn't casting any huge distances or anything like that, but if it was not for the kindness of that gentleman, I might never have tried fly fishing again.

    Same thing happened for me.
  • outdoorsmanoutdoorsman Member Posts: 85 Member
    I'll usually just offer a basic tip here and there. I have learned much of what I know from experience and practice, so I won't walk somebody through about how to catch a fish in a certain spot. But I might say what I've been successful on that day, or even give a casting tip or two. I was given such tips when I was just starting, and they were enough to keep me into flyfishing and motivated me to improve. If somebody had just told me everything I know now, instead of me learning it myself, then I don't think that it would have been as satisfying. Learning is an important part of the process, especially since we all have our own views and methods of fishing. Back when I could barely cast, but was learning tons with each fishing trip, was some of the most satisfying fishing that I think I'll ever have (but definitely not the most productive in terms of catch).
  • SilverCreekSilverCreek Senior Member Posts: 131 Senior Member
    What I do depends on the person and my situation. If I am in a hurry, I'll just go my way. If it is near the end of my trip or fishing day, I'll make small talk and ask them if they want help. Most of them will say yes and be grateful.

    If it is a kid I will almost always help.

    HKteaching.jpg

    I've given impromptu casting lessons many times.

    Sometimes, a person will be fishing on a spot that I know has fish and that I can catch them. I'll watch them and after about 5 - 10 minutes of them not doing things right, I'll ask them if they want help. Most of them will say yes.

    Then I'll tell them that they have their equipment rigged wrong and if they mind if I use my rod and reel. I've never had a person refuse. I'll explain what I am doing and why; and after I catch a fish, I'll rig them up with the right fly and help them catch their first fish on their equipment.

    Usually they will ask me to stay and fish with them. They know that if they lose that fly, they will need another one from me. So we share the spot.
  • FlykuniFlykuni Senior Member Posts: 799 Senior Member
    This subject shouldn't even be discussed in polite, flyfishing company. Fishing in general is a dying sport. Kids today are stuck to video screens. We built forts and treehouses, made slingshots and dropped birds at 60' with Daisys. Raised tadpoles to frogs, kept snakes and lizards, and we can't find the moment to help a newbie, young or old? Ambassador yrself and do it soon, or early next season. I may fish bamboo but I can be personally flexible.

    The sport does not grow. The out-of-doors experience, for any traditional outdoors sport, seems on the wane.

    When was the last time you saw lots of kids at a club meeting? Most are packed with Boomers and a few older types. At local flyfishing shows I always notice how few kids attend. When I was a boy there were Sportsmen Shows in Los Angeles at a Streamline 1930s convention hall and they were wonderful to attend with dad. We'd come away with arms full of brochures, we'd look at the lodge booths, stuffed animals (someone always had a standing grizz), guns in racks, the great tackle companies were all represented and a local paper had a cut-out coupon and if you presented it they handed you a fiberglass bait pole and you caught a (stocker) trout -- which they'd take off your line, snap its head back and they'd gut and clean the thing and hand you the fish in a plastic bag to carry home. Good times. And there were hundreds if not thousands of kids in attendance. Place would get picketed nowadays. And we shy at helping someone who needs help flyfishing? Boy, we're elite at our own cost fellas.

    I say promote the sport by promoting good will to newbies. Did just so at YNP this past August, coming upon several new ones. Caddis were popping and trout were breaching on the Firehole and I got out of the rental to say, Hey, they rising yet? Guy said quietly, I wish someone would show me how to do this...he had on a bushy attractor, and was getting no strikes. Walked back to car, got out Filson, got out Elk and CDC, dropped it on him and said to try this. Cost me nothing, bison burger could wait. Hope he caught a ton.

    We all start somewhere in this sport. If we want it to continue past our measly lives we have to work to pass it on. For the early to medium Boomer -- our dads and uncles and neighbors who taught us of the outdoors are mostly gone. And what parent today would let "the neighbor guy" take their son fishing? I had an uncle who picked me up before sunup, wrapped me in a blanket like a burrito and carried me to the car. We were gone till dinner. Won't ever forget him.

    Hope you're doing that today. Hope you help a stranger on the water.
  • 1mocast1mocast Junior Member Posts: 2 Junior Member
    Nicely said Kuni.

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