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Attn: Swizz

Shawn C.Shawn C. Senior MemberPosts: 7,027 Senior Member
I have a question that you may be of help with.

I have a small addition on my brick house that is finished in cedar plank siding. I'm guessing this addition is 25-30 years old. About 75% of it is in pretty good shape, but I have one side of this addition that is really screwed. The wood siding needs replaced. I would like to strip the old stain (it is a fairly opaque stain but not as much as paint) off of wood that is in good shape to bring it back to something resembling un-finished wood. If I could do that then I could re-side the one exposure and stain it all so that everything matches.

And while I have your attention, do you have any thoughts on using a sealer (like a silicone type) to seal up gaps between the siding and door/window trim? I figure if I'm stripping or sanding off the old finish I may as well do a good prep before staining again.

Thanks for any help you may be able to provide. I know your thing is chinking but figured you may have experience in wood finishing and preservation.

Replies

  • swizzswizz Senior Member Posts: 2,570 Senior Member
    I can't help with the stain issue, not my forte. For caulking, stay away from silicone! I can recommend three caulking products which are latex-based and formulated for that type of application. All three can be purchased in tubes and have color selections. These are all water-based products and can be tooled with your finger. Cleanup is easy with water and wet rag.
    Permachink Energy Seal
    Sashco Log Builder
    Sashco Big Stretch
    All of your Trout are belong to me.
  • Shawn C.Shawn C. Senior Member Posts: 7,027 Senior Member
    Thank you! That's great that it comes in colors.
  • CO NativeCO Native Senior Member Posts: 1,883 Senior Member
    Swizz, why no silicone? Curious minds want to know.
  • swizzswizz Senior Member Posts: 2,570 Senior Member
    Several reasons...
    Silicone is generally designed for non-porous surface applications like porcelain, glass, metal, etc. It bonds best to these types of surfaces.
    Silicone is non-paintable.
    Silicone is EXTREMELY difficult to remove and replace once cured. Eventually all caulking sealants need to be repaired or replaced. When I am bidding a project that requires silicone removal the labor cost skyrockets.
    Silicone is more difficult (and messy) to install for a non-professional.
    All of your Trout are belong to me.
  • BushartBushart Senior Member Posts: 3,041 Senior Member
    swizz wrote: »
    Several reasons...
    Silicone is generally designed for non-porous surface applications like porcelain, glass, metal, etc. It bonds best to these types of surfaces.
    Silicone is non-paintable.
    Silicone is EXTREMELY difficult to remove and replace once cured. Eventually all caulking sealants need to be repaired or replaced. When I am bidding a project that requires silicone removal the labor cost skyrockets.
    Silicone is more difficult (and messy) to install for a non-professional.

    and don't forget........IT SMELLS LIKE VINEGAR!!!

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