Go to trout rod

So, you're off to your favorite trout river, stream, creek, whatever.

What's the rod you're most likely going to sting up for that water?

Lately, I've been using a 7' 5wt, LL Bean First Cast rod. Bought it 10 years ago for my son (then age 9) for about $90 (including reel, line and backing). It casts dries really well and sometimes I can still roll cast under overhanging tree limbs.

Foam grip and plastic reel seat, but it gets the job more than done.
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Replies

  • fishingcomicfishingcomic Senior Member Posts: 21,872 Senior Member
    Around here and much of NY, I use a 6' Avid 3wt.
    'I've spoken of the Shining City all my political life. …In my mind it was a tall, proud city built on rocks stronger than oceans, windswept, God-blessed, and teeming with people of all kinds living in harmony and peace; a city with free ports that hummed with commerce and creativity. And if there had to be city walls, the walls had doors and the doors were open to anyone with the will and the heart to get here. That's how I saw it, and see it still.'" Ronald Reagan
  • ouzelproouzelpro Senior Member Posts: 5,361 Senior Member
    Well, you are easy to please.

    My current go to is an old Scott A2 five weight. I use it for nymphs, dries, streamers, everything from Smallmouth to pike. I wouldn't mind a six weight from time to time.
  • George KGeorge K Super Moderator Posts: 8,945 Senior Member
    For trout, an Orvis Superfine (original unsanded series) 7'9" 2wt, Sage LL 7'9" 4wt or Diamondback (original spigot ferrule series) 7' 3/4wt, depending on water conditions.

    For steelhead, a Fenwick "World Class" G-IV 8' 5/6wt or an East Branch 9' 6wt, again depending on water conditions.

    I built all of these from blanks. Part of the reason I love them is that they have the exact combination of grip, seat and guide type and spacing that suits me.
    Keep your stinkin' government hands off my Medicare.
  • JulietJuliet Posts: 0
    ouzelpro wrote: »
    Well, you are easy to please.

    My current go to is an old Scott A2 five weight. I use it for nymphs, dries, streamers, everything from Smallmouth to pike. I wouldn't mind a six weight from time to time.

    I generally know what's going on before I even get on the stream, so I tend to pick my weekends when dry fly fishing is going to be at its best. The streams I fish are generally so narrow, that I have never fished a streamer in Wisconsin. No room to high-stick (I nymph straight upstream) let alone swing streamers.
  • JulietJuliet Posts: 0
    ricinus wrote: »
    A Mike Brooks Payne 100 Bamboo 4wt. Casts like a dream and when you hook a fish, I swear you feel it's heartbeat.

    Mike

    I just googled him up. The rods shown on Coldwater Collectibles are beautiful. Reasonably priced (for 'boo) as well.

    I used to take my Orvis Battenkill out all the time, but after the second time I fell, broke it, and paid some ungodly amount to have it fixed, I decided that was it.
  • George KGeorge K Super Moderator Posts: 8,945 Senior Member
    (I nymph straight upstream)

    Ten points and a gold star for Steven.:)
    Keep your stinkin' government hands off my Medicare.
  • Brian D.Brian D. Senior Member Posts: 4,011 Senior Member
    My go-to rod is a G. Loomis Streamdance "high line speed" GLX. It is truly the best 5wt. All who say otherwise are just ignernt beeches.

    I've got a 3wt Loomis Metolius that I love for small streams, an 8'6" 4wt GLX that sees duty as a backup trout rod, an 8wt Sage that goes carp fishing, streamer fishing, and to the salt with me, a 6wt TFO that is a good bass/carp/streamer rod, and so forth.

    But if I had to sacrifice all but one of those rods, the GLX 5wt would be the one I kept.

    bd
  • bakerloobakerloo Banned Posts: 980 Senior Member
    Winston WT 8'6" 5 wt.
    "So what is big is not always the Trout nor the Deer but the chance, the being there. And what is full is not necessarily the creel nor the freezer, but the memory."
    Aldo Leopold
  • fishingcomicfishingcomic Senior Member Posts: 21,872 Senior Member
    My first rod was an LL Bean, I can't remember if was a first cast or not, 8'6" 5wt. I loved that rod, I gave it to my Dad.
    'I've spoken of the Shining City all my political life. …In my mind it was a tall, proud city built on rocks stronger than oceans, windswept, God-blessed, and teeming with people of all kinds living in harmony and peace; a city with free ports that hummed with commerce and creativity. And if there had to be city walls, the walls had doors and the doors were open to anyone with the will and the heart to get here. That's how I saw it, and see it still.'" Ronald Reagan
  • JulietJuliet Posts: 0
    My go to rod is 10.5 foot 3 weight. I almost always nymph.

    But If I'm in the drift boat, my go to rod is a 6 weight sage z-axis.
  • briankbriank Junior Member Posts: 2 Junior Member
    With the diverse fishing habitat here in Maine, my go-to rod depends on where I'm going.

    On the bigger salmon rivers (East Outlet of the K, West Branch of the P), it's a 10-foot, 6 wt. Redington RS2. Great nymphing rod. Capable of throwing big streamers when necessary. Also a great rod to fish from a canoe, kayak or float tube.

    I've been doing a lot of fishing for river smallies lately with an old Orvis Silver Label 6'6 5 wt. (full flex). Fun rod. I love the super slow action.

    For smaller trout waters, I use a St. Croix Avid 7-foot, 3 wt. The mid-flex action is superb.

    In the salt it's a nine-foot, 9 wt. Redington Wayfarer. Good rod, but I find that in the salt, having a fast-shooting, slick line is the important thing.
    www.magictotempole.com: Fly fishing news, features and fish tales from websites and blogs across cyberspace, hand-selected and updated daily. | Twitter: www.magictotempole.com/twitter
  • JulietJuliet Posts: 0
    Steven wrote: »
    So, you're off to your favorite trout river, stream, creek, whatever.

    What's the rod you're most likely going to sting up for that water?

    Lately, I've been using a 7' 5wt, LL Bean First Cast rod. Bought it 10 years ago for my son (then age 9) for about $90 (including reel, line and backing). It casts dries really well and sometimes I can still roll cast under overhanging tree limbs.

    Foam grip and plastic reel seat, but it gets the job more than done.

    this is a real ... 'it depends' sort of question

    depends on the water, the conditions and time of year

    if I am going to smaller water and it's a calm summers kind of day in the Driftless then it's my 4 wt Pennignton Boo' or my 3 wt Winston and even on the bigger waters around W Wis for those conditions likely the same

    If I am in the driftboat somewheres around Bozangeles then likely will be my 5 wt Sage XP (tried n true and reliable) I can shift from dries to nymphing to streamers without switching rods and deal with any likely wind ... if in the same area fishing a springcreek then likely a 5 wt Winston Joan Wulff or a 4 wt as either will make delicate presentations to clear water and spooky fish

    if back in the Driftless and the weather has left things unsettled and I am fishing off color water then again likely back to a 5 wt so I can chuck n duck with a streamer or nymph rig

    I guess the only way it comes down to just one 'go to' rod is if you fish the same water or same kind of water only under certain conditions ... besides ... variety ads spice to life if not the rod rack ;-)
  • JulietJuliet Posts: 0
    sherb wrote: »
    But If I'm in the drift boat, my go to rod is a 6 weight sage z-axis.

    I have this rod in an 8 weight for throwing bass bugs and streamers to smallies and pike flies

    one of the most effortless rods I have ever cast ... makes fishing big flies all day long more of a pleasure than a chore!

    [/ two opposable monkey thumbs up for this rod]
  • Shawn C.Shawn C. Senior Member Posts: 5,728 Senior Member
    I always take alog my Sage 8.5' 5WT XP and generally use it for most of the fishing I do. Funny thing is I generally do not prefer fast action rods. Picked this one up on clearance the year they discontinued it and much to my surprise I really enjoy it. I like it's versatility as it is good for casting weighted nymphs.
    The local streams where I'm at you are either nymph fishing and catching some or just practicing your dry fly casting for long portions of the day.
  • George KGeorge K Super Moderator Posts: 8,945 Senior Member
    sherb wrote: »
    My go to rod is 10.5 foot 3 weight. I almost always nymph.

    But If I'm in the drift boat, my go to rod is a 6 weight sage z-axis.

    I've only been a drift boat a few times, but always took my Winston LT 8'9" 5wt and was very happy with it. This the rod I would choose if I could only have one trout rod. It does everything well, but is not my "go to" choice because I have other rods that are better in specific situations.
    Keep your stinkin' government hands off my Medicare.
  • Fly GoddessFly Goddess Junior Member Posts: 21 Junior Member
    My small stream is "The Test" by Hardy, for Rivers JWF, and for stillwater, Orvis Zero and BIIx
  • JulietJuliet Posts: 0
    My small stream is "The Test" by Hardy,
    Hey FG,

    Was that one of the glass rods that Hardy brought out a few years ago?
  • Fly GoddessFly Goddess Junior Member Posts: 21 Junior Member
    Yes it is. It is so sweet.

    IMG_3567.jpg
  • chewydogchewydog Junior Member Posts: 3 Junior Member
    Sage XP 490-4. (except pike)
  • magallowaymagalloway Senior Member Posts: 900 Senior Member
    bakerloo wrote: »
    Winston WT 8'6" 5 wt.

    Pretty much my choice too, unless I'm slinging streamers. Then, I'll go to an old LL Bean SPT 9-foot six-weight just for the extra oomph.

    Jim
  • yataheyyatahey Senior Member Posts: 5,605 Senior Member
    It all depends on the streams I'm fishing. Most often used rod is my 9' 5wt Sage Launch for dries (sometimes nymphing when I only want to bring 1 rod) with a thread furled leader AND A TIPPET RING. Next for streamers and nymphing my 9' 5wt St Croix. It's faster than the Sage. For smaller streams my Okuma 7' 3wt is the go to rod. For Pike and Bass I use a 8'6" Eagle Claw Black Eagle WalMart special 7wt.
    "When the goin gets weird, the weird turn pro." Hunter S. Thompson
  • Fly GoddessFly Goddess Junior Member Posts: 21 Junior Member
    Love the Robot Chicken....Stoopid Monkey
  • nimrodnimrod Senior Member Posts: 756 Senior Member
    Whichever one is hanging in the antlers on the porch. Now that both tips on 'the Don' are broke it would be that Orvis Battenkill of yours if you brought it up here. I'm not fussy...the IM6 Winston 9ft 4wt or the Orvis tippet. Sometimes the far and fine...or whatever I can scrounge from my friends to try. Of course if I only fished once a season I might be a whole lot fussier...
  • JasonJason Member Posts: 33 Member
    Only the best 5wt - a Winston BIIx 8'6" 5wt that I got for joining TU.
  • JulietJuliet Posts: 0
    nimrod wrote: »
    Whichever one is hanging in the antlers on the porch. Now that both tips on 'the Don' are broke it would be that Orvis Battenkill of yours if you brought it up here.

    You're an equal opportunity destroyer of bamboo rods.
  • nimrodnimrod Senior Member Posts: 756 Senior Member
    Two broken tips in 20 minutes should be some kind of record...ten thousand trout is enough for any rod I suppose, and a new Don Schroeder for $700 was cheap. It doesn't owe me a thing. Better days...

    dscf08872.jpg
  • Spade HackleSpade Hackle Junior Member Posts: 3 Junior Member
    George K wrote: »
    I've only been a drift boat a few times, but always took my Winston LT 8'9" 5wt and was very happy with it. This the rod I would choose if I could only have one trout rod. It does everything well, but is not my "go to" choice because I have other rods that are better in specific situations.

    I'll be floating the Ark this weekend and will be throwing double dries with my Winston LT 8'9: 5 wt all day! Sweet FISHING rod, casts great, fishes better, fast enough for the raft, protects tippets. Yum, just need another rower so I can fish 2/3's of the time!

    SH
  • Fly GoddessFly Goddess Junior Member Posts: 21 Junior Member
    nimrod wrote: »
    Two broken tips in 20 minutes should be some kind of record...ten thousand trout is enough for any rod I suppose, and a new Don Schroeder for $700 was cheap. It doesn't owe me a thing. Better days...

    dscf08872.jpg


    Now that is what I am talkin' about....NIIIICE!
  • Dave MDave M Junior Member Posts: 6 Junior Member
    Sage XP 490-4. Does everything I need a trout rod to do. For long distance throws I pair it with a Hardy LRH spooled with a WF-4 Sharkskin.
    On the Spring Creeks I put on an Abel Creek spooled with an older (softer) Orvis Wonderline.

    Nothing in trout fishing those two outfits won't do
    except, of course......bank banging huge articulated Streamers in the fall......but for that specialized stuff I bump up to a 7 weight (overkill for every other trout fishing situation, however).

    Dave M
    PS: Interesting new Board......we'll see

    PPS: Kerrist--every time the Board changes I lose all my previous posts> Back down to "one"??
  • EdBEdB Senior Member Posts: 2,847 Senior Member
    My go to is a 9.5' 6 wt. Orvis Silver Label tip flex. It's great in the wind and handles the 20" plus browns and rainbows on the upper Delaware very well. I consider that river system the best for trout in the East and maybe the entire country, and that's just abouit the only place I fish anymore.
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