It's up to Congress, now.

Don NewtonDon Newton Senior MemberPosts: 431 Senior Member
Soooo, nothing will be done.

Praise da Lawd an' pass da gas masks.

Just sayin' ...






****, ah jes luvs the smell of VX/SARIN in the morning. :rolleyes:
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Replies

  • jbillyjbilly Senior Member Posts: 5,259 Senior Member
  • EdBEdB Senior Member Posts: 2,933 Senior Member
    If nothing will be done militarily, that will be good. I hope the do nothing Congress votes no, it depends on how many can be bribed to vote yes.
  • jbillyjbilly Senior Member Posts: 5,259 Senior Member
    Actually Ed for once I mostly agree with you. We shouldn't be sticking our nose in this and never should have opened up our fat mouths in the first place. The line should never have been drawn to begin with.

    Where I differ though is now that we were stupid and flapped our gums and drew this line I believe we better put our money (and cruise missiles, which I guess are one and the same) where our leaderships mouths are.
  • EdBEdB Senior Member Posts: 2,933 Senior Member
    I don't think we need to backup the stupid red line with a military attack, that would make us just as stupid as the guy who drew the line.
  • yataheyyatahey Senior Member Posts: 5,605 Senior Member
    Obama has found a way out. Give it to Congress.
    "When the goin gets weird, the weird turn pro." Hunter S. Thompson
  • creekguycreekguy Senior Member Posts: 3,905 Senior Member
    US foreign policy has ALWAYS threatened military action against countries that have stockpiled or used chemical agents. How soon we forget that the neocons was all for a massive invasion against a country that used them internally and was just rumored to still have stockpiles of these weapons. It's not just some red line, we have always had this policy. So now we have Republicans criticizing the president for restating what had essentially always been US policy, and suddenly becoming peaceniks in order to do so. Kinda hypocritical? Shocker.
  • jbillyjbilly Senior Member Posts: 5,259 Senior Member
    creekguy wrote: »
    US foreign policy has ALWAYS threatened military action against countries that have stockpiled or used chemical agents. How soon we forget that the neocons was all for a massive invasion against a country that used them internally and was just rumored to still have stockpiles of these weapons. It's not just some red line, we have always had this policy. So now we have Republicans criticizing the president for restating what had essentially always been US policy, and suddenly becoming peaceniks in order to do so. Kinda hypocritical? Shocker.

    Well then call me a hypocrite because just like last week I say $hit or get off the pot. If this is going to be our policy then fine, I don't necessarily agree with it but that is my 2 cents, but enforce it. I don't necessarily like ou policy of being the wrolds police force, but if it is going to be our role then we should embrace that role and do it.
  • yataheyyatahey Senior Member Posts: 5,605 Senior Member
    jbilly wrote: »
    Well then call me a hypocrite because just like last week I say $hit or get off the pot. If this is going to be our policy then fine, I don't necessarily agree with it but that is my 2 cents, but enforce it. I don't necessarily like ou policy of being the wrolds police force, but if it is going to be our role then we should embrace that role and do it.

    Well here's the rub with that idea. Evidence, evidence, evidence. Let's not forget Iraq so soon eh.
    "When the goin gets weird, the weird turn pro." Hunter S. Thompson
  • jbillyjbilly Senior Member Posts: 5,259 Senior Member
    yatahey wrote: »
    Well here's the rub with that idea. Evidence, evidence, evidence. Let's not forget Iraq so soon eh.

    Well which piece of evidence" do you want to believe. The one from the other thread or this or ???

    http://thecable.foreignpolicy.com/posts/2013/08/30/us_had_intel_on_chemical_strike_before_it_was_launched
  • yataheyyatahey Senior Member Posts: 5,605 Senior Member
    Let's let Congress sort it out. They did such a lousy job with Iraq, maybe they'll be a little more careful this time.
    "When the goin gets weird, the weird turn pro." Hunter S. Thompson
  • creekguycreekguy Senior Member Posts: 3,905 Senior Member
    No don't think you are JB. I think both sides are sensing that the public has become sick of constant warfare on behalf of other people around the world.
    I just think this event is going to open a pandora's Box of nerve gas on the world, and its scary.
  • creekguycreekguy Senior Member Posts: 3,905 Senior Member
    yatahey wrote: »
    Well here's the rub with that idea. Evidence, evidence, evidence. Let's not forget Iraq so soon eh.

    Yat, why would anyone believe that the Rebel elements, who we saw in another thread making improvised weapons, would be capable of making and using Sarin or other nerve gas?? or that they would use them on what appear to be friendlies. Suddenly people are asking for evidence? it's a way to crawfish out of the responsibility to act.
  • yataheyyatahey Senior Member Posts: 5,605 Senior Member
    The gas was supplied by a Saudi and the release was accidental.

    http://www.infowars.com/rebels-admit-responsibility-for-chemical-weapons-attack/
    "When the goin gets weird, the weird turn pro." Hunter S. Thompson
  • Just another Obama foreign affairs ef up.


    Who sets out a red line and then says "wait, I have to ask if I can enforce it?" His own party isn't going to support it with a large majority and he had to know that the Ron/Rand Paul segment of the Republican party would be against.

    The President shouldn't have gone to Congress and should have just ordered a missile launch.
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 4,746 Senior Member
    yatahey wrote: »
    The gas was supplied by a Saudi and the release was accidental.

    http://www.infowars.com/rebels-admit-responsibility-for-chemical-weapons-attack/
    Infowars?

    Really???
  • EdBEdB Senior Member Posts: 2,933 Senior Member
    Infowars?

    Really???

    It's not only infowars.

    August 03, 2013
    http://www.examiner.com/article/syrian-rebels-admit-to-being-behind-chemical-weapons-attack


    Members of the Syrian rebel movement have admitted that they were behind the Aug. 21 chemical weapons attack near Damascus, Minnesota's Mint Press News reported on Thursday.

    According to the report, the chemicals were provided by Saudi Prince Bandar bin Sultan, who “has been at the very heart of the push for war by the U.S. against Assad.”

    The group Doctors Without Borders went to the town of Ghouta, where more than 350 people were killed as a result of the chemical attack. After interviewing “numerous...doctors, Ghouta residents, rebel fighters and their families,” the group obtained testimony that the attack was a result of mismanagement and ignorance on the part of the rebels, who didn't realize that they had chemical weapons.
  • creekguycreekguy Senior Member Posts: 3,905 Senior Member
    Steven wrote: »
    Just another Obama foreign affairs ef up.


    Who sets out a red line and then says "wait, I have to ask if I can enforce it?" His own party isn't going to support it with a large majority and he had to know that the Ron/Rand Paul segment of the Republican party would be against.



    The President shouldn't have gone to Congress and should have just ordered a missile launch.

    There was always a "red line". Remember a certain President who launched a massive invasion simply because these weapons were "thought" to have been merely stockpiled? Probable action against countries who actually use WMD's has always been an assumption of US foreign policy. What has changed is that because of those past events, based on lies, and gross mismanagement of the wars, the public has finally become weary of foreign involvements on behalf of other cultures. And that is NOT Obama's fault. If we had not invaded Iraq, would there be any impediment to Obama doing now what he thought necessary in Syria? i don't think so.
  • Uhmm, that's a little revisionist. While Iraq was about WMD, it was about the potential use of WMD against American targets. That simply is not the case here.

    Moreover, I absolutely do remember a President not doing anything when the gas attacks against the Kurds happened, so I have difficulty buying that the use of gas has always been assumed to be a reason for U.S. action. (enter Ed noting that we didn't do anything when Saddam gassed Iranian forces).

    If the line from Obama supporters is that he has been prevented from going forth and doing something about Syria because of Iraq, I'd have to ask why the President wasn't smart enough to see it?

    But to my point. Rules of the playground. You said you're going to do something, do it. Don't ask for cover.
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 4,746 Senior Member
  • What do the Teabagger of his party have to say?
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 4,746 Senior Member
    Well, Herman Cain doesn't like Boehner siding with Obama.

    http://www.caintv.com/boehner-and-pelosi-agree-both

    It makes it interesting: does one side with Boehner or with Cain? Hmmmm....
  • It will be interesting to see where Rubio, Cruz, Rand side on this.
  • Well, is seems Boehner has thrown in with Obama...


    Stock market was booming until this news came out.
  • MikeAMikeA Senior Member Posts: 4,027 Senior Member
    The Oil companies are singing the Happy days are here again song.
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 4,746 Senior Member
    Steven wrote: »
    Stock market was booming until this news came out.
    So Boehner and Obama are both conspiring to wreck the American economy?
  • They're trying to support the housing market by boosting the risk-on trade.
  • creekguycreekguy Senior Member Posts: 3,905 Senior Member
    So, Assad is a tool of Iran, which is a tool of Russia and Putin. We will be fighting a proxy war against Russian influence in the ME. Nothing has changed since the fall of the Berlin Wall. Am I right?
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 4,746 Senior Member
    Greece is collapsing, the Iranians are getting aggressive, and Rome is in disarray. Welcome back to 430 BC.
  • I think Iran and Russia is more a case of the enemy of my enemy is my friend.
    Iran is the Dennis Rodman of the Middle East. You put Iran on your team but you're never quite comfortable with what might happen.
  • swizzswizz Senior Member Posts: 2,559 Senior Member
    creekguy wrote: »
    So, Assad is a tool of Iran, which is a tool of Russia and Putin. We will be fighting a proxy war against Russian influence in the ME. Nothing has changed since the fall of the Berlin Wall. Am I right?
    In my opinion you are right.
    Best course of action based on that: US needs to quit playing into this BS. Pull our **** out of the ME and let them gas themselves into oblivion already.
    Fix our country before we try to play 'world ethics enforcer'... that should be the role of U.N. or NATO
    who the hell do we think we are? fix our own problems here before cramming our ethics down everyone's throats.
    Really sick of us getting into conflicts where we don't belong.
    Dear Obama... I thought you were doing fairly well with foreign relations/policies. Based on this developing event you suck even worse than Bush in the war dept.
    All of your Trout are belong to me.

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