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Thread: Chuck Bug

  1. #1
    Senior Member ScottP's Avatar
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    Chuck Bug

    Minor variation on the Gartside Sparrow; use the butt ends (wrapped) of the marabou for the body, palmered with grizzly dyed olive hackle. Don't fish streamers that much any more, but last time I checked, it still got the fishes interest. Have had real good luck with this for trout in the east and west; smallies like it, too. Named after my neighbor, who first showed it to me after (not before, mind you * ) he absolutely schooled a number of supposedly wary trout on a well-known PA spring creek with this fly.

    hook - Mustad 36890 #6 (salmon hook not required but makes it look a bit classier)
    thread - UTC 160 *olive-brown
    tail - marabou blood olive
    body - butt ends of marabou, wrapped
    rib - copper wire small
    body hackle - saddle olive/grizzly
    collar hackle - pheasant rump
    head - pheasant aftershaft feather




    attach thread to hook, wrap back to the bend, tying wire rib in




    tie in marabou feather, let the tail extend about 1 shank length




    grab butt ends (the feather's, not yours) & twist into a rope/chenille




    wrap forward and tie off at head. Chuck's original was tied with a floss body, which made for a skinny fly. I like it a bit meatier so go with the marabou, the same way I tie most of my Buggers (actually the fly up to the pheasant rump collar is pretty much a Bugger); also makes for a faster tie.




    tie in saddle hackle (webbier the better) at head




    wrap back to the tail




    then wrap wire rib forward through hackle (trim hackle at tail and wire at front)




    prep a pheasant rump feather, stripping away excess fuzz




    then pull back feather barbules leaving a few at the tip for tie-in



    tie in rump feather at tip with dull side up (don't trim it until the feather's been wrapped; otherwise it may pull out)



    wet fingers, stroke fibers back









    wrap rump feather forward and tie off









    split thread (UTC is great for this app)









    insert aftershaft feather (makes it a bit more durable)









    spin loop to trap feather & create "chenille"









    wet fingers, stroke chenille back, wrap forward







    tie off at head and brush with Miss Sally









    finished fly







    Pretty easy fly to tie and ugly ones work just as well as "keepers". Tan, brown and black have been good colors, too.


    Regards,
    Scott
    Last edited by ScottP; 09-20-2012 at 12:21 PM.
    They say the times are changing but I just don't know

  2. #2
    Senior Member ricinus's Avatar
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    Nice fly, would work in stillwaters too...

    Mike
    My new goal in life is to become an Alter Kaker...

  3. #3
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    Nice fly, Scott. My only question is, what kind of terminal rig do you use to fling it/sink it to its effective zone as a streamer?

    Jim

  4. #4
    Senior Member ScottP's Avatar
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    Jim,

    Most of the streams I fished it on were pretty small so I didn't really need to much of anything. The times I fished it on some Blackfeet lakes I used a full-sink (think it was a type 6) and just did the count-down 'till I hit weeds or it got bit. I was out there in mid-summer when the fish were usually deep; if I could have fished after ice-out I probably could have gone with floating or intermediate line. I guess you could weight the fly - lead or lead-free wraps, conehead, dumbell eyes, etc.

    Regards,
    Scott
    They say the times are changing but I just don't know

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