Replies

  • StevenSteven Senior Member Posts: 1,966 Senior Member
    This is perfectly accurate, so I'd say no. But if it were, what would he be trying to signal?
  • sherbsherb Senior Member Posts: 1,782 Senior Member
    Well, I come down on the "its a true statement" side as well, so I don't know. The usual suspects are calling it a dog whistle.
  • sherbsherb Senior Member Posts: 1,782 Senior Member
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  • StevenSteven Senior Member Posts: 1,966 Senior Member
    When I read Anglo and sheriff, the Sheriff of Nottingham is exactly who I pictured.
  • StevenSteven Senior Member Posts: 1,966 Senior Member
    The English language has completely deteriorated in this country.

    The first definition of Anglo offered in Webster's is a white American. It's not until we get to the second or third definition that is "of, or pertaining to, England."
  • Shawn C.Shawn C. Senior Member Posts: 5,376 Senior Member
    Well, I wonder if he had invoked “Franco-American” while talking to people in Louisiana if they would say it was a dog whistle. He didn’t say white heritage so I have no problem with it.

    Brings to mind when a lawmaker a few years ago used the word reneging and people lost their minds.
  • StevenSteven Senior Member Posts: 1,966 Senior Member
    I think that was niggardly.

    And believe it or not, that was in 1999.
  • George KGeorge K Super Moderator Posts: 8,481 Senior Member
    Despite his past I'd give Sessions the benefit of the doubt on this. CNN needs to read up on history a bit more, though. The office was not always an elected one.
    Keep your stinkin' government hands off my Medicare.
  • Green Mt BoyGreen Mt Boy Senior Member Posts: 624 Senior Member
    It comes across as politically incorrect, but it accurate.

    County mounties and a few state police are pretty much it for LE around here.

    Whenever I see a sheriff's cruiser, which is not very often, I channel Bob Marley.
  • George KGeorge K Super Moderator Posts: 8,481 Senior Member
    Here in PA county sherifs (elected) and deputies are not law enforcement officers in the traditional sense. They can make arrests, but they do not go on patrol or investigate crimes. Their main duties are serving eviction notices and transporting county prisoners back and forth to court. State and local police handle other duties.

    I don't know if PA is unique is this.
    Keep your stinkin' government hands off my Medicare.
  • Green Mt BoyGreen Mt Boy Senior Member Posts: 624 Senior Member
    George K wrote: »
    Here in PA county sherifs (elected) and deputies are not law enforcement officers in the traditional sense. They can make arrests, but they do not go on patrol or investigate crimes. Their main duties are serving eviction notices and transporting county prisoners back and forth to court. State and local police handle other duties.

    I don't know if PA is unique is this.

    Pretty much the same here. Back when I did a lot of civil litigation I had sheriffs serve all sorts of process-summonses, subpoenas, writs of possession, writs of attachment and, this nice old nugget of Anglo American law, writs of replevin.

    Some towns contract with county sheriffs (who per the state constitution are elected) for law enforcement patrols.
  • fishingcomicfishingcomic Senior Member Posts: 21,341 Senior Member
    Pretty sure the sheriff of Nottingham is the villain.
    'I've spoken of the Shining City all my political life. …In my mind it was a tall, proud city built on rocks stronger than oceans, windswept, God-blessed, and teeming with people of all kinds living in harmony and peace; a city with free ports that hummed with commerce and creativity. And if there had to be city walls, the walls had doors and the doors were open to anyone with the will and the heart to get here. That's how I saw it, and see it still.'" Ronald Reagan
  • NZ IndicatorNZ Indicator Senior Member Posts: 9,100 Senior Member
    The usual suspects indeed. LOL.

    The world is watching what we do today in America. They will know what we do here today, and they will treat all of us accordingly in the future—our soldiers, our diplomats, our journalists, anybody who travels beyond these borders. I hope we remember this as we go forward. I sincerely hope we can protect what has been called the "great writ"—a writ that has been in place in the Anglo-American legal system for over 700 years.

    -Senator Barack Obama
    Floor Statement September 27, 2006
  • fishingcomicfishingcomic Senior Member Posts: 21,341 Senior Member
    Shawn C. wrote: »
    Well, I wonder if he had invoked “Franco-American” while talking to people in Louisiana if they would say it was a dog whistle.

    why would he be talking about Spaghetti O's in Louisiana?
    'I've spoken of the Shining City all my political life. …In my mind it was a tall, proud city built on rocks stronger than oceans, windswept, God-blessed, and teeming with people of all kinds living in harmony and peace; a city with free ports that hummed with commerce and creativity. And if there had to be city walls, the walls had doors and the doors were open to anyone with the will and the heart to get here. That's how I saw it, and see it still.'" Ronald Reagan

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