It's been a year...

24

Replies

  • StevenSteven Senior Member Posts: 2,202 Senior Member
    That is exactly how I responded to the Monkey and I'll be damned, he was right.

    So, yes I'm saying the sweet corn is better here than in Iowa, Wisconsin and Minnesota.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

    On my way to tune you up, I'm going to stop and beat the crap out of CO Native.
  • creekguycreekguy Senior Member Posts: 3,905 Senior Member
    Olathe, Colorado: trout in the AM, sweet corn in the PM. Don't know how you beat that.
  • GoldenladleGoldenladle Super Moderator Posts: 3,775 Senior Member
    Steven wrote: »
    On my way to tune you up, I'm going to stop and beat the crap out of CO Native.


    I'll have some corn ready.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

    Moved to Montana, gonna be a dental floss tycoon.

  • NZ IndicatorNZ Indicator Senior Member Posts: 9,191 Senior Member
    Corn...If you don't chew it, it goes right through it...
  • CO NativeCO Native Senior Member Posts: 969 Senior Member
    Bring it on quick, the Olathe sweet is in it's prime, so you'll see what I'm talking about. Plus the rivers are just getting down to good fishing level. ;-)
  • George KGeorge K Super Moderator Posts: 8,709 Senior Member
    creekguy wrote: »
    Olathe, Colorado: trout in the AM, sweet corn in the PM. Don't know how you beat that.

    You guys are easy to please.

    How about Chesapeake Bay stripers or blues in the morning, softshells or crab cakes for lunch, more stripers and blues, then a 90 minute drive back to Pennsylvania for the evening rise, followed by the adult beverage of your choice. If you insist you can add some Maryland Eastern Shore sweet corn to compare with the mid-western and western varieties. :)
    Keep your stinkin' government hands off my Medicare.
  • creekguycreekguy Senior Member Posts: 3,905 Senior Member
    We're talking sweet corn here, sir. There's a size limit on bragging.
  • fishingcomicfishingcomic Senior Member Posts: 21,550 Senior Member
    I do miss urban living. But I am 20 minutes from a trout stream I can catch a handful of fish from in a couple of hours all on dry flies.
    'I've spoken of the Shining City all my political life. …In my mind it was a tall, proud city built on rocks stronger than oceans, windswept, God-blessed, and teeming with people of all kinds living in harmony and peace; a city with free ports that hummed with commerce and creativity. And if there had to be city walls, the walls had doors and the doors were open to anyone with the will and the heart to get here. That's how I saw it, and see it still.'" Ronald Reagan
  • NZ IndicatorNZ Indicator Senior Member Posts: 9,191 Senior Member
    I do miss urban living. But I am 20 minutes from a trout stream I can catch a handful of fish from in a couple of hours all on dry flies.
    That's 100x better than living in or near urban. Good for you!

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
  • BushartBushart Senior Member Posts: 1,793 Senior Member
    I do miss urban living. But I am 20 minutes from a trout stream I can catch a handful of fish from in a couple of hours all on dry flies.

    See the mind plays tricks on us---at times only remembering the good times

    Go on a hot summer couple of days to a big centre---sit idle in rush hour---get bumped a couple times in a mall
    you'll soon remember why you wanted to leave
  • George KGeorge K Super Moderator Posts: 8,709 Senior Member
    I would not want to live without the amenities of a large city, but I no longer want to live in one. We're in the country, but just an hour to Baltimore and less than two to DC. This suits us just fine. I love to visit out west, but could not live in places like Laramie or Steamboat where we have (or have had) step-kids living, much less really rural areas.
    Keep your stinkin' government hands off my Medicare.
  • ricinusricinus Senior Member Posts: 6,214 Senior Member
    It depends on what you want. I enjoy going to the city (15min) and having a nice meal, shopping at the smaller stores, hitting the farmer's market and having access to hospitals and specialists. The idea of getting away from it all appealed to me when I was younger, but as I age my priorities have changed..

    Mike
    My new goal in life is to become an Alter Kaker...
  • CO NativeCO Native Senior Member Posts: 969 Senior Member
    George K wrote: »
    You guys are easy to please.

    How about Chesapeake Bay stripers or blues in the morning, softshells or crab cakes for lunch, more stripers and blues, then a 90 minute drive back to Pennsylvania for the evening rise, followed by the adult beverage of your choice. If you insist you can add some Maryland Eastern Shore sweet corn to compare with the mid-western and western varieties. :)

    The problem with that is that you must be on the east coast, and I've spent enough time there to realize that there are waaaaay to many people and most of them are ****. So I'll stick to sweet corn and trout.
  • George KGeorge K Super Moderator Posts: 8,709 Senior Member
    CO Native wrote: »
    The problem with that is that you must be on the east coast, and I've spent enough time there to realize that there are waaaaay to many people and most of them are ****. So I'll stick to sweet corn and trout.

    I take it you spent years meeting and evaluating the millions upon millions of people who live on the east coast before reaching your conclusion. No ani in Colorado, right?
    Keep your stinkin' government hands off my Medicare.
  • fishingcomicfishingcomic Senior Member Posts: 21,550 Senior Member
    I found that the majority of people in NYC were friendly, so if they were not to you, you might want to ask yourself why.
    'I've spoken of the Shining City all my political life. …In my mind it was a tall, proud city built on rocks stronger than oceans, windswept, God-blessed, and teeming with people of all kinds living in harmony and peace; a city with free ports that hummed with commerce and creativity. And if there had to be city walls, the walls had doors and the doors were open to anyone with the will and the heart to get here. That's how I saw it, and see it still.'" Ronald Reagan
  • NZ IndicatorNZ Indicator Senior Member Posts: 9,191 Senior Member
    Bushart wrote: »
    Go on a hot summer couple of days to a big centre---sit idle in rush hour---get bumped a couple times in a mall
    you'll soon remember why you wanted to leave

    ^^^This. Totally agree.

    My friend that left Chicago for small town Lower Michigan has had to return to Chicago a few times to take care of some family stuff. He now kicks himself in the **** for not getting out sooner and said he waisted a lot of his life living there. You spend half your life sitting in a car moving at snails pace staring at tail lights.
  • fishingcomicfishingcomic Senior Member Posts: 21,550 Senior Member
    Bushart wrote: »
    See the mind plays tricks on us---at times only remembering the good times

    Go on a hot summer couple of days to a big centre---sit idle in rush hour---get bumped a couple times in a mall
    you'll soon remember why you wanted to leave

    Never wanted to leave. I could take a train to a river I had to myself in the morning and go to live theater or perform comedy in the evening. Not to mention having access to some of the best restaurants in the world. I could do all my Christmas shopping within 3 blocks of my apartment. I like people, so the crowds didn't bother me.
    'I've spoken of the Shining City all my political life. …In my mind it was a tall, proud city built on rocks stronger than oceans, windswept, God-blessed, and teeming with people of all kinds living in harmony and peace; a city with free ports that hummed with commerce and creativity. And if there had to be city walls, the walls had doors and the doors were open to anyone with the will and the heart to get here. That's how I saw it, and see it still.'" Ronald Reagan
  • CO NativeCO Native Senior Member Posts: 969 Senior Member
    George K wrote: »
    I take it you spent years meeting and evaluating the millions upon millions of people who live on the east coast before reaching your conclusion. No ani in Colorado, right?

    Actually, if you evaluate the ones that move here, it's obvious. If they'd move back, we'd all be happier.
  • NZ IndicatorNZ Indicator Senior Member Posts: 9,191 Senior Member
    Not to mention having access to some of the best restaurants in the world. I could do all my Christmas shopping within 3 blocks of my apartment.

    I hear this all the time, but what's wrong with making your own food? I've been to big cities, I've eaten at nice places...but nice or best restaurants would never be a reason I would want to live near/in/next to all of that which is known as the rat race. There's more to life than having a nice restaurant nearby no? I'd rather be living in a place that had access to the best trout streams in the world and other outdoor related activities.

    Seems a good chunk of the people from Chicago agree with me...our state is flooded with Chicago folks every weekend on the highways and towns. WI has what they don't have. Driftless area of WI it isn't uncommon see more Illinois plates on the streams than WI plates. Same goes for northern WI where a majority of our lakes our.

    Shopping...shop from the convenience of your home online and have it delivered. No wear and tear on the car, no time spent waiting in lines.

    Maybe that's just me. I hate crowds and everything that is big city.
  • CO NativeCO Native Senior Member Posts: 969 Senior Member
    Maybe that's just me. I hate crowds and everything that is big city.

    Amen brother.
  • GoldenladleGoldenladle Super Moderator Posts: 3,775 Senior Member
    Maybe that's just me. I hate crowds and everything that is big city.

    I think its because you were raised in rural Michigan/Wisconsin and never spent any significant time in the big city. I was born in Chicago, raised sort of in rural Minnesota (St. Cloud) But I lived in Minneapolis for a huge chunk of my life. At this point I could take living in the city or living in the country, I like both. Of course living where I do now is pretty neat and I don't plan on moving anytime soon. I have all I really need here and If I can't find it, I either buy it online or drive to Missoula (45 miles).

    Moved to Montana, gonna be a dental floss tycoon.

  • StevenSteven Senior Member Posts: 2,202 Senior Member
    Never wanted to leave. I could take a train to a river I had to myself in the morning and go to live theater or perform comedy in the evening. Not to mention having access to some of the best restaurants in the world. I could do all my Christmas shopping within 3 blocks of my apartment. I like people, so the crowds didn't bother me.

    LA...could go surfing in the morning, skiing in the afternoon. Catch a concert at the Roxy that night.

    I love Wisconsin, but you can't do that in the cheesehead state.
  • creekguycreekguy Senior Member Posts: 3,905 Senior Member
    I will simply say that home is where your friends are. (fade in song about being lonely in L.A.). I've been happy in Houston Texas: nuff said. A recruiter once said to me, the best beach there is at the airport.
  • NZ IndicatorNZ Indicator Senior Member Posts: 9,191 Senior Member
    I think its because you were raised in rural Michigan/Wisconsin and never spent any significant time in the big city. I was born in Chicago, raised sort of in rural Minnesota (St. Cloud) But I lived in Minneapolis for a huge chunk of my life. At this point I could take living in the city or living in the country, I like both. Of course living where I do now is pretty neat and I don't plan on moving anytime soon. I have all I really need here and If I can't find it, I either buy it online or drive to Missoula (45 miles).
    Could be. But I have friends that left the big city and they have always stated it was the best decision they ever made with no desire to ever go back.

    I've also talked with numerous business owners in my area that come from Chicago/Milwaukee area....it's the same story...glad to be out of the rat race.

    I've had times in my life where I have had to spend 4-5 days in Chicago, Boston or Minneapolis for work. I couldn't wait to get the f**k out of those places. Spent a week on family vacation once in the Washington D.C. and Baltimore area. Same thing...was glad to leave those place.

    I just scratch my head wondering how anyone can live like that...spend your life staring at tail lights in slow moving traffic or having to take trains/taxis to get where you need to go based on their schedule not yours. I prefer the freedom of my own car.

    You have it good there Mike. Much better than the concrete jungle you came from.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
  • Green Mt BoyGreen Mt Boy Senior Member Posts: 647 Senior Member
    This is a pointless discussion. People like to live where they want to live--more often than not due to where the grew up--and there is no objective right or wrong to any given choice.

    I grew up in an old farmhouse two miles down a dirt road. My brother and I, and a couple of kids who lived down the road at a big dairy farm, would roam the woods with an axe in one hand and a .22 in the other. If it moved we shot it; if it didn't move we hacked it with the axe.

    Fast forward 40+ years and I am living in a old (but renovated) farmhouse on a dirt road about a mile from the pavement. Our house sits on 140 acres (it is an old hill farm), and we have a third interest (with my neighbors, who live far enough away that I can't see them) in another 77 acres. Our land backs up to 1000s of acres of forest owned by other people. I live where it very hilly. We're up on a big hill at 1,500 feet and have a 180 degree view of the Green Mountains from my front porch and beyond them I can see 60 miles over to Mt. Washington and the Presidential Range. When I deer hunt in November I just walk out the door. I do have to get into my vehicle to go trout fishing and drive, gasp, 20 minutes.

    I have an 8 mile commute to work in Montpelier which, while small, has a surprising number of good restaurants, movie theaters, live theatrical productions, etc. It is small, though, and one often sees the same people on the street over and over again. On the one hand that it is nice--sense of community and all that good stuff, but on the other hand there are times when I'd like more anonymity.

    I like to visit big cities but can't imagine living in one. For one thing you need a boat load of money, especially so that you can get away. But, what do you do when you are home on, say, a weekend, and want to get out and stretch your legs? Run along some busy highway hyperventilating car exhaust? Go to a park that was designed by human beings and crowded with human beings? I just take a long walk or XC ski on my land.

    Edited to add: But, it sucks here, so don't move here.
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 9,618 Senior Member
    Could be. But I have friends that left the big city and they have always stated it was the best decision they ever made with no desire to ever go back.

    I've also talked with numerous business owners in my area that come from Chicago/Milwaukee area....it's the same story...glad to be out of the rat race.

    I've had times in my life where I have had to spend 4-5 days in Chicago, Boston or Minneapolis for work. I couldn't wait to get the f**k out of those places. Spent a week on family vacation once in the Washington D.C. and Baltimore area. Same thing...was glad to leave those place.

    I just scratch my head wondering how anyone can live like that...spend your life staring at tail lights in slow moving traffic or having to take trains/taxis to get where you need to go based on their schedule not yours. I prefer the freedom of my own car.

    You have it good there Mike. Much better than the concrete jungle you came from.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

    Some people prefer the city. Don't know why you're trying to convince them that everyone would be better off in rural areas.

    Besides, it looks like you would want to keep that quiet. We can't take all of them out here.
  • BushartBushart Senior Member Posts: 1,793 Senior Member
    This is a pointless discussion. People like to live where they want to live--more often than not due to where the grew up--and there is no objective right or wrong to any given choice.

    I grew up in an old farmhouse two miles down a dirt road. My brother and I, and a couple of kids who lived down the road at a big dairy farm, would roam the woods with an axe in one hand and a .22 in the other. If it moved we shot it; if it didn't move we hacked it with the axe.

    Fast forward 40+ years and I am living in a old (but renovated) farmhouse on a dirt road about a mile from the pavement. Our house sits on 140 acres (it is an old hill farm), and we have a third interest (with my neighbors, who live far enough away that I can't see them) in another 77 acres. Our land backs up to 1000s of acres of forest owned by other people. I live where it very hilly. We're up on a big hill at 1,500 feet and have a 180 degree view of the Green Mountains from my front porch and beyond them I can see 60 miles over to Mt. Washington and the Presidential Range. When I deer hunt in November I just walk out the door. I do have to get into my vehicle to go trout fishing and drive, gasp, 20 minutes.

    I have an 8 mile commute to work in Montpelier which, while small, has a surprising number of good restaurants, movie theaters, live theatrical productions, etc. It is small, though, and one often sees the same people on the street over and over again. On the one hand that it is nice--sense of community and all that good stuff, but on the other hand there are times when I'd like more anonymity.

    I like to visit big cities but can't imagine living in one. For one thing you need a boat load of money, especially so that you can get away. But, what do you do when you are home on, say, a weekend, and want to get out and stretch your legs? Run along some busy highway hyperventilating car exhaust? Go to a park that was designed by human beings and crowded with human beings? I just take a long walk or XC ski on my land.

    Edited to add: But, it sucks here, so don't move here.



    Yeah your just south and east of me (Ontario)
    Green rolling hills here as well

    We are remote enough here that in the 60's we had an influx of draft dodgers and commune flower children tryin to find nature

    And yes it sucks here also, so ya would'nt want to move here
  • NZ IndicatorNZ Indicator Senior Member Posts: 9,191 Senior Member
    This is a pointless discussion. People like to live where they want to live--more often than not due to where the grew up--and there is no objective right or wrong to any given choice.

    I grew up in an old farmhouse two miles down a dirt road. My brother and I, and a couple of kids who lived down the road at a big dairy farm, would roam the woods with an axe in one hand and a .22 in the other. If it moved we shot it; if it didn't move we hacked it with the axe.

    Fast forward 40+ years and I am living in a old (but renovated) farmhouse on a dirt road about a mile from the pavement. Our house sits on 140 acres (it is an old hill farm), and we have a third interest (with my neighbors, who live far enough away that I can't see them) in another 77 acres. Our land backs up to 1000s of acres of forest owned by other people. I live where it very hilly. We're up on a big hill at 1,500 feet and have a 180 degree view of the Green Mountains from my front porch and beyond them I can see 60 miles over to Mt. Washington and the Presidential Range. When I deer hunt in November I just walk out the door. I do have to get into my vehicle to go trout fishing and drive, gasp, 20 minutes.

    I have an 8 mile commute to work in Montpelier which, while small, has a surprising number of good restaurants, movie theaters, live theatrical productions, etc. It is small, though, and one often sees the same people on the street over and over again. On the one hand that it is nice--sense of community and all that good stuff, but on the other hand there are times when I'd like more anonymity.

    I like to visit big cities but can't imagine living in one. For one thing you need a boat load of money, especially so that you can get away. But, what do you do when you are home on, say, a weekend, and want to get out and stretch your legs? Run along some busy highway hyperventilating car exhaust? Go to a park that was designed by human beings and crowded with human beings? I just take a long walk or XC ski on my land.

    Edited to add: But, it sucks here, so don't move here.
    Sounds like you live in a great place like me. Trout fishing and hunting ~20 minutes out the back door.

    I just spent the past 2 days this weekend fishing the trico hatch. Was a 25 minute drive to the spot. Life is good.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
  • fishingcomicfishingcomic Senior Member Posts: 21,550 Senior Member
    Steven wrote: »
    LA...could go surfing in the morning, skiing in the afternoon. Catch a concert at the Roxy that night.

    I love Wisconsin, but you can't do that in the cheesehead state.

    When I was younger and I would move away from California, I would make a point of skiing on Saturday and golfing on Sunday before I left.
    'I've spoken of the Shining City all my political life. …In my mind it was a tall, proud city built on rocks stronger than oceans, windswept, God-blessed, and teeming with people of all kinds living in harmony and peace; a city with free ports that hummed with commerce and creativity. And if there had to be city walls, the walls had doors and the doors were open to anyone with the will and the heart to get here. That's how I saw it, and see it still.'" Ronald Reagan
  • fishingcomicfishingcomic Senior Member Posts: 21,550 Senior Member
    I hear this all the time, but what's wrong with making your own food? I've been to big cities, I've eaten at nice places...but nice or best restaurants would never be a reason I would want to live near/in/next to all of that which is known as the rat race. There's more to life than having a nice restaurant nearby no? I'd rather be living in a place that had access to the best trout streams in the world and other outdoor related activities.

    Seems a good chunk of the people from Chicago agree with me...our state is flooded with Chicago folks every weekend on the highways and towns. WI has what they don't have. Driftless area of WI it isn't uncommon see more Illinois plates on the streams than WI plates. Same goes for northern WI where a majority of our lakes our.

    Shopping...shop from the convenience of your home online and have it delivered. No wear and tear on the car, no time spent waiting in lines.

    Maybe that's just me. I hate crowds and everything that is big city.

    What you call a rat race, I call excitement. I loved how alive the city would become in the spring. I like people.
    Chicago folks every weekend on the highways and towns. WI has what they don't have.

    Did you notice they only choose to visit?
    'I've spoken of the Shining City all my political life. …In my mind it was a tall, proud city built on rocks stronger than oceans, windswept, God-blessed, and teeming with people of all kinds living in harmony and peace; a city with free ports that hummed with commerce and creativity. And if there had to be city walls, the walls had doors and the doors were open to anyone with the will and the heart to get here. That's how I saw it, and see it still.'" Ronald Reagan

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