Thoughts and Prayers for southern Ca

MikeAMikeA Senior MemberPosts: 2,561 Senior Member
Hard to watch some of the videos and slideshows. I hope they get it under control soon but the forecast looks bad, real bad.

https://www.cbsnews.com/pictures/california-fires-los-angeles-bel-air-getty-center-thomas-ventura-county-brentwood-wildfires/

Comments

  • George KGeorge K Super Moderator Posts: 8,459 Senior Member
    The loss of life is horrifying, the loss of people's properties tragic. I hope a complete disaster can be avoided.

    I understand that many people do not have the luxury of choosing where to live. But it is no secret that much of California and nearby states is a fire zone waiting to happen at any time, that much of the West Coast lies on fault lines, that the East, South and Midwest are riddled with flood zones and that the South and East coasts are prone to hurricane and other storm damage. So why do people build where they shouldn't and then rebuild on the same spot over and over after predictable natural destruction?
    Keep your stinkin' government hands off my Medicare.
  • sherbsherb Senior Member Posts: 1,762 Senior Member
    Its that chaparral. That stuff burns like gasoline.

    There's a mountain pass right in the city of LA. The 405 freeway runs through it. Hard to get away from the fires.
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 9,571 Senior Member
    George K wrote: »
    The loss of life is horrifying, the loss of people's properties tragic. I hope a complete disaster can be avoided.

    I understand that many people do not have the luxury of choosing where to live. But it is no secret that much of California and nearby states is a fire zone waiting to happen at any time, that much of the West Coast lies on fault lines, that the East, South and Midwest are riddled with flood zones and that the South and East coasts are prone to hurricane and other storm damage. So why do people build where they shouldn't and then rebuild on the same spot over and over after predictable natural destruction?

    Dunno about the fires, but here close to hurricane territory, the risk is actually not all that great. Look at last year. Irma downed power lines, messed up some property, but within a few weeks it was back to normal, save the cleanup. If Florida was hit every year by an Andrew, it would be different. But we look forward to hurricanes, as they bring much-needed rain, usually.
  • fishingcomicfishingcomic Senior Member Posts: 21,335 Senior Member
    George K wrote: »
    The loss of life is horrifying, the loss of people's properties tragic. I hope a complete disaster can be avoided.

    I understand that many people do not have the luxury of choosing where to live. But it is no secret that much of California and nearby states is a fire zone waiting to happen at any time, that much of the West Coast lies on fault lines, that the East, South and Midwest are riddled with flood zones and that the South and East coasts are prone to hurricane and other storm damage. So why do people build where they shouldn't and then rebuild on the same spot over and over after predictable natural destruction?

    I don't think all of us can fit into Montana and Idaho.

    Most Californians think that when we watch a Malibu mansion fall into the ocean.

    But that 405 corridor does not have much of a history of fires.
    'I've spoken of the Shining City all my political life. …In my mind it was a tall, proud city built on rocks stronger than oceans, windswept, God-blessed, and teeming with people of all kinds living in harmony and peace; a city with free ports that hummed with commerce and creativity. And if there had to be city walls, the walls had doors and the doors were open to anyone with the will and the heart to get here. That's how I saw it, and see it still.'" Ronald Reagan
  • CO NativeCO Native Senior Member Posts: 883 Senior Member
    sherb wrote: »
    Its that chaparral. That stuff burns like gasoline.

    There's a mountain pass right in the city of LA. The 405 freeway runs through it. Hard to get away from the fires.

    I was curious about what the vegetation was that was burning. Why is there no fire mitigation around housing areas?
  • George KGeorge K Super Moderator Posts: 8,459 Senior Member
    Buffco wrote: »
    Dunno about the fires, but here close to hurricane territory, the risk is actually not all that great. Look at last year. Irma downed power lines, messed up some property, but within a few weeks it was back to normal, save the cleanup. If Florida was hit every year by an Andrew, it would be different. But we look forward to hurricanes, as they bring much-needed rain, usually.

    I was thinking of coastal properties on or near the water that have been destroyed and rebuilt - often with taxpayer assistance - multiple times. I have distant relatives who have rebuilt a house on the same waterfront site near Pensacola twice in recent years after hurricanes. I believe Texas finally tired of rebuilding private beaches and passed a law saying that owners of private houses that wind up below the high water mark may not prevent public access through what was formerly their land.
    Keep your stinkin' government hands off my Medicare.
  • creekguycreekguy Senior Member Posts: 3,905 Senior Member
    CO Native wrote: »
    I was curious about what the vegetation was that was burning. Why is there no fire mitigation around housing areas?

    Wind, wind, and more wind! If its at 80 mph, you don't have to have much vegetation around to keep it going. Its mitigation, not prevention. I am surprised that you would ask that, you coming from Colorado.
  • FishTXFishTX Super Moderator Posts: 7,643 Senior Member
    CO Native wrote: »
    I was curious about what the vegetation was that was burning. Why is there no fire mitigation around housing areas?

    Money. Same reason people don't want to spend extra on building houses that are somewhat resistant to catching fire from embers.

    I'd guess they also don't want to look a giant fire break, but cities are hardly natural, so an extension of city's boundary in the form of a break or a thinned forest with little in the way of an understory shouldn't be a problem.
    "We have to find someone who can not only fly this plane, but who didn't have fish for dinner."

    Crooow:This music would work better with women in bikinis shaking all over the place. I guess that's true of any music really.
  • CO NativeCO Native Senior Member Posts: 883 Senior Member
    creekguy wrote: »
    Wind, wind, and more wind! If its at 80 mph, you don't have to have much vegetation around to keep it going. Its mitigation, not prevention. I am surprised that you would ask that, you coming from Colorado.

    Fire mitigation saved our cabin from a fire while others around ours burned to the ground. Being prepared makes a huge difference. I would think that cleaning up around a subdivision wouldn't be too tough.
  • Shawn C.Shawn C. Senior Member Posts: 5,345 Senior Member
    FishTX wrote: »
    I'd guess they also don't want to look a giant fire break

    That is one of the reasons here in UT. People like the trees and natural look. Can you blame them? Defensible space is valuable but is it worth it? People's yards in my neighborhood (not all, but some) are very thick with gambel's oak, which burn like crazy. They look great and attract a lot of local wildlife. I'm sure I would keep those oaks too if I had that property but I would have a gassed-up chainsaw in the garage during fire season.
  • FishTXFishTX Super Moderator Posts: 7,643 Senior Member
    I can't complain. I'm in a forested area and really need to clean up around my place.
    "We have to find someone who can not only fly this plane, but who didn't have fish for dinner."

    Crooow:This music would work better with women in bikinis shaking all over the place. I guess that's true of any music really.
  • magallowaymagalloway Senior Member Posts: 832 Senior Member
    That chaparral, buckbrush, or whatever you want to call it, is the only thing holding the soil in place. If you scoop out enough brush to build a mansion, or God help us a subdivision, you're almost guaranteeing a mudslide within a few years.

    Jim
  • Shawn C.Shawn C. Senior Member Posts: 5,345 Senior Member
    magalloway wrote: »
    That chaparral, buckbrush, or whatever you want to call it, is the only thing holding the soil in place. If you scoop out enough brush to build a mansion, or God help us a subdivision, you're almost guaranteeing a mudslide within a few years.

    Jim

    True. This winter/spring could be just horrible with the mudslides. I think Kanaloa was correct in his oft-repeated idea that a lot of the problems are that there are just too many people living on this rock of ours.

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